Rates won’t rise at 2-year colleges

OLYMPIA – Community college students received official word Friday they won’t be paying higher tuition this fall.

The State Board for Community and Technical Colleges voted in the morning to freeze rates for resident and nonresident students. It will be the first time since 1989 that tuition will not rise at any of the state’s two-year colleges.

“Congratulations everyone. History has been made,” said board chairwoman Beth Willis following the decision. “This is very big. What a boon for our students.”

Lawmakers, as part of last month’s agreement on a new two-year state budget, pumped roughly $40 million more into Washington’s two-year college system and barred tuition from climbing this fall for students who are residents of Washington.

But they left the door open for increasing the price for out-of-state students who already pay more than twice as much as resident students at each of the 34 colleges.

Over the years any tuition increase on resident students triggered an increase for nonresident enrollees. Board members decided Friday they could be consistent with that practice by freezing rates for everyone.

It means tuition will remain at $4,000 per year for resident students and $9,235 for nonresident students in the 2013-14 academic year. Those figures are based on a 15-credit load for a full school year.

“Everett Community College supports the state board’s decision not to increase tuition for nonresident students to ensure our state remains competitive in attracting international students,” EvCC President David Beyer said. “We’re also grateful for the Legislature’s decision to increase state support for higher education that led to no tuition increases for Washington state students.”

Carol Summers, vice president for College Relations and Advancement at Edmonds Community College, felt the same way.

“Increasing funding for higher education while at the same time holding down tuition costs is a great outcome for both Edmonds CC and our students,” she said.

“Clearly the Legislature understands the importance of community colleges,” she said. “They also heard the concerns of students who are struggling to afford their college educations.”

Of the 19,530 students who attended EvCC in the 2012 school year, 1,108 were nonresidents. Edmonds Community College reported 2,088 nonresident students out of 20,305.

Jerry Cornfield: 360-352-8623; jcornfield@heraldnet.com.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Washington State Governor Jay Inslee speaks with special ed Pre-K teacher Michelle Ling in her classroom at Phantom Lake Elementary School in Bellevue, Wash. Tuesday, March 2, 2021. (Ellen M. Banner/The Seattle Times via AP, Pool)
Governor: Educators are now eligible for coronavirus vaccine

“This should give educators more confidence,” Jay Inslee said. Other frontline workers could soon be next.

A view of the courtyard leading to the main entrance of the new Stanwood High building on Thursday, Jan. 21, 2020 in Stanwood, Washington. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Law gives Washington high school seniors leeway to graduate

Gov. Jay Inslee signed a bill that can waive some requirements for students who were on track before the pandemic.

About a dozen metal dinosaurs sit in the front yard of a home owned by Burt Mason and Mary Saltwick on Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021 in Freeland, Washington. The couple are used to finding strangers in their yard and taking photos. Every year on their trip to Tucson, Burt and Mary bring home another figure  (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Dinos on Whidbey? This Freeland yard is a Jurassic Park

These creatures from long ago won’t chomp or chase you, and you’re welcome to visit.

Maryville Getchell High School students Madison Dawson, left, Kaden Vongsa and Jenasis Lee, who made a presentation to their school board discussing mental health, lack of resources and personal stories of their peers mental health struggles. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Students plead for better mental health support from schools

Three Marysville Getchell seniors want more counselors and improved training for staff.

Parked tractor-trailers line the side of 40th Avenue NE on Friday, Feb. 26, 2021 in Marysville, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Worker wonders why dead end Marysville road is rough and rutty

A stretch of 40th Avenue NE is mostly used for heavy trucking and isn’t in line for repairs soon.

Camano Island shooting leaves father dead; son arrested

Dominic Wagstaff, 21, was taken into custody late Sunday for investigation of the murder of Dean Wagstaff, 41.

Jean Shumate (left), seen here during a February 2019 school board meeting, will retire June 30 after 20 years at the Stanwood-Camano School District superintendent. (Skagit Valley Herald)
Stanwood-Camano superintendent to retire after 20 years

Jean Shumate has been at the helm longer than any other superintendent in Snohomish County.

A boy raises his hand during a lesson at Starbright Early Learning Center on Friday, June 5, 2020 in Everett. The Snohomish County Council is expected to vote Wednesday on a measure that would add early learning centers to a spending plan for the Puget Sound Taxpayer Accountability Account. (Olivia Vanni / Herald file)
County Council proposes to address a big pre-K learning gap

Members are rethinking how to spend earmarked education money to “make a real difference.”

Mark Mulligan / The Herald
Sunset Falls cascades down past the existing fish ladder along the Skykomish River east of Index, February 4, 2014.
Photo taken 20140214
New hatchery on Skykomish to end practice of importing fish

A plan to capture fish from Sunset Falls near Index and release them in the river is open for public comment.

Most Read