Survey ends soon on Everett school schedule

EVERETT — If you want to get an earful from school parents, just propose changing the start and end times for the school day.

So far, people have responded 4,000 times to the Everett School District’s online survey on changing school schedules for the upcoming school year.

To encourage participation, the school district has contacted parents via email, phone messages, through its electronic newsletter plus Facebook and Twitter.

Parents, staff and the public can participate in the survey until 8 a.m. Tuesday.

The proposed changes in school days would affect most of the district’s schools.

Just how much of a change, though, would depend on which of the three options under consideration is adopted.

The most any school time could change — earlier or later— is 20 minutes.

Under one plan, most of the changes are starting and ending the school days 20 minutes earlier; under another, starting and ending it 20 minutes later. Under the third option, the change in start and end times is 10 minutes, either earlier or later, said Mary Waggoner, school district spokeswoman.

As one example, Madison Elementary School could start at 8:25 a.m., 8:35 a.m. or 8:45 a.m. The school day could end at 2:35 p.m., 2:45 p.m. or at 2:55 p.m.

Similar time changes are being considered at the district’s middle schools and all of its high schools except Sequoia.

The district is considering the change to help ease bus schedules increasingly slowed by traffic congestion, Waggoner said. Crowded roads are causing struggles in keeping the buses on schedule.

So far this year, the district has added three new bus routes and modified four others at Cascade and Jackson high schools to help ease scheduling problems, Waggoner said.

Those changes cost the district about $160,000, she said.

That’s money that could be used to support classroom work, Waggoner said. So the changes in school start and end times were proposed for next year to try to save that expense.

However, it’s too early to know how that money, if saved, might be used in the upcoming school year, she said.

Kim Guymon, who heads the Everett School Board Project, a citizens advocacy group, said she began hearing from parents shortly after the proposal was announced several weeks ago.

Elementary school start times could be pushed back to 9:35 a.m. Some parents would have to delay the start to their work day to nearly 10 a.m., Guymon said. That could create friction with bosses.

“I haven’t run into anyone who says ‘I don’t care,’” she said. “Everyone has a pretty passionate negative opinion on this.”

Kim Mead, president of the Everett Education Association, said she’s heard the most concern about the proposed later starts for elementary schools, since younger kids tend to be more alert earlier in the day compared to high school students.

Although the savings that could result from the scheduling changes are relatively small compared to the overall school district budget of $192 million, “any savings that we can have means there’s that much more they can put into the classroom,” Mead said. “I do understand why they’re taking a look at it.”

Sharon Salyer: 425-339-3486 or salyer@heraldnet.com.

Take the survey

The Everett School District has posted an online survey at www.surveymonkey.com/s/KDQ8X26 for people to express their preferences on proposed school schedule changes next year. The survey closes at 8 a.m. Tuesday.

Talk to us

More in Local News

After escaping on Wednesday, an emu named Sarah has been safely returned to AJ's Acre, a farm located near the Alexander Road and the Mukilteo Speedway. (AJ's Acre)
An escaped emu is returned to its farm in Mukilteo

Missing since Wednesday, the female bird was noticed by a neighbor and safely recovered Saturday.

Frances McDormand in "Nomadland." (Searchlight Pictures) 20210304
Masked in a nearly empty theater, a movie outing at last

Just four of us were in the audience for a matinee showing of “Nomadland” at Stanwood Cinemas.

A Marysville Pilchuck football player sports a spear on his helmet as the Tomahawks took on Snohomish in the Wesco 3A Championship Friday evening at Quil Ceda Stadium on November 1, 2019. School district leaders may soon need to consider dropping Marysville Pilchuck High School’s mascot, the Tomahawks. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Should Marysville Pilchuck High drop the name ‘Tomahawks’?

A state bill would ban Native American mascots and symbols from schools — unless there is tribal permission.

Broadway closed after ‘small explosive device’ is found

The Everett Police Department bomb squad responded and “rendered it inert.”

Mark Mulligan / The Herald
Sunset Falls cascades down past the existing fish ladder along the Skykomish River east of Index, February 4, 2014.
Photo taken 20140214
New hatchery on Skykomish to end practice of importing fish

A plan to capture fish from Sunset Falls near Index and release them in the river is open for public comment.

James Myles walks his 5-month-old Pembroke Welsh Corgi Ellie around Martha Lake Park on Tuesday, March 2, 2021 in Lynnwood, Washington. Myles entered Ellie into a contest called Americas Favorite Pet, where she's currently in 2nd place for her group. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Vote for Ellie: Fluffy corgi from Lynnwood vying for top dog

“Her Fluffiness” is competing to be America’s Favorite Pet. The contest raised $300,000 for PAWS last year.

Washington State Governor Jay Inslee speaks with special ed Pre-K teacher Michelle Ling in her classroom at Phantom Lake Elementary School in Bellevue, Wash. Tuesday, March 2, 2021. (Ellen M. Banner/The Seattle Times via AP, Pool)
Governor: Educators are now eligible for coronavirus vaccine

“This should give educators more confidence,” Jay Inslee said. Other frontline workers could soon be next.

Riaz Khan speaks at the groundbreaking at the site of the Islamic Center of Mukilteo that he helped spearhead over the last seven years on Saturday, March 6, 2021 in Mukilteo, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Ground is broken for Mukilteo’s own mosque

The Islamic Center of Mukilteo has been seven years in planning.

Most Read