A giant Bigfoot creation made by Terry Carrigan, 60, at his home-based Skywater Studios on Sunday, April 14, 2024 in Monroe, Washington. (Annie Barker / The Herald)

A giant Bigfoot creation made by Terry Carrigan, 60, at his home-based Skywater Studios on Sunday, April 14, 2024 in Monroe, Washington. (Annie Barker / The Herald)

The 1,500-pound Sasquatch: Bigfoot comes to life in woods near Monroe

A possibly larger-than-life sculpture, created by Terry Carrigan of Skywater Studios, will be featured at this weekend’s “Oddmall” expo.

MONROE — Bigfoot weighs heavily on Terry Carrigan’s mind, and it’s only a matter of time before Sasquatch comes to life.

What’s up with that?

Carrigan started building the 8-foot Bigfoot in February. The 80-pound bags of concrete kept adding up for the big dude.

“Last night I was so tired, as soon as I lay down my brain started thinking, ‘Shoot, how much is he going to weigh? Is my Bobcat going to be able to lift him up to get on the trailer?’” he said last week.

Measurements for a giant Bigfoot creation made by Terry Carrigan, 60, at his home-based Skywater Studios on Sunday, April 14, 2024 in Monroe, Washington. (Annie Barker / The Herald)

Measurements for a giant Bigfoot creation made by Terry Carrigan, 60, at his home-based Skywater Studios on Sunday, April 14, 2024 in Monroe, Washington. (Annie Barker / The Herald)

He made the sculpture, estimated to weigh 1,500 pounds, at his home-based Skywater Studios deep on 5 acres in the woods between Monroe and Sultan.

“I’m the kind of person people call when they don’t know who to contact to get something made,” he said. “That’s what we do, make unusual things.”

This weekend, he plans to display Bigfoot at his booth at the “Oddmall: Emporium of the Weird” expo at the Monroe fairgrounds. For $15,000 you can take Bigfoot home, though you’ll need a big truck. A 4-foot sea turtle he made, weighing a mere 220 pounds, is $1,500.

A sea turtle that Terry Carrigan, 60, made at his home-based Skywater Studios on Sunday, April 14, 2024 in Monroe, Washington. (Annie Barker / The Herald)

A sea turtle that Terry Carrigan, 60, made at his home-based Skywater Studios on Sunday, April 14, 2024 in Monroe, Washington. (Annie Barker / The Herald)

Smaller Skywater Studios wares include a urethane dental-like mold of a mouth that holds 28 driver bits, complete with silicone tongue, $37 with the bits, or $27 without. A skull that holds paint brushes or longer driver bits is $25.

Oddmall has artists, crafters, jugglers, authors, illustrators and purveyors of unusual things: dolls made out of animal bones, Star Trek potholders, glass mushrooms. For people not in this realm, it is easy to forget that such creativity exists. Even more of a reason to go. The all-ages event is free.

A creation made by Terry Carrigan, 60, at his home-based Skywater Studios on Sunday, April 14, 2024 in Monroe, Washington. (Annie Barker / The Herald)

A creation made by Terry Carrigan, 60, at his home-based Skywater Studios on Sunday, April 14, 2024 in Monroe, Washington. (Annie Barker / The Herald)

Carrigan, 60, is experienced with the tools of the trade. He made Halloween haunts at Knott’s Berry Farm theme park in California and created props for Disneyland and other attractions.

His wife, Julie Bach, also an artist, is in charge of paint.

“I’m colorblind,” he said.

In 2015, the couple moved to Washington to get out of California. In the sticks south of the Skykomish River, they built a temporary studio and kept adding to it.

He put up a web page offering custom fabrications.

“People started calling me,” he said. “Every project is unique.”

Terry Carrigan, 60, adds touches to the base of a giant Bigfoot he made at his home-based Skywater Studios on Sunday, April 14, 2024 in Monroe, Washington. (Annie Barker / The Herald)

Terry Carrigan, 60, adds touches to the base of a giant Bigfoot he made at his home-based Skywater Studios on Sunday, April 14, 2024 in Monroe, Washington. (Annie Barker / The Herald)

Projects include a 9-foot stiletto high heel made of rolls of real toilet paper and escape room themes.

A 5-foot green apple with a bite taken out in The Schoolhouse District community hub in downtown Woodinville caught the attention of Ron Nardone. You know, the owner of NardoLand, that wacky wonderland of giant sculptures, vintage signs, replica gas station and other buildings on his acreage on Paradise Lake Road in Maltby.

Nardone commissioned Carrigan to make a big red apple, without the bite, and a 6-foot ice cream cone.

“The guy is a great artist and I am going to have him keep doing stuff,” Nardone said. He’s considering a Colonel Sanders statue to go with the giant KFC bucket and chicken on the grounds.

A giant Bigfoot creation made by Terry Carrigan, 60, at his home-based Skywater Studios on Sunday, April 14, 2024 in Monroe, Washington. (Annie Barker / The Herald)

A giant Bigfoot creation made by Terry Carrigan, 60, at his home-based Skywater Studios on Sunday, April 14, 2024 in Monroe, Washington. (Annie Barker / The Herald)

Nardone contemplated buying Bigfoot, but decided, “It doesn’t fit my theme.”

Carrigan is making him a 10-foot bottle of ketchup that will say “NardoLand” in Heinz script.

“I’m supposed to have been working on that instead of Bigfoot, but I got sidetracked,” he said.

Carrigan used a 3D printer to make a little model of the sea turtle for scale. He didn’t use it for Bigfoot, but can print a 20-inch model of the finished product, if you want.

A 6-foot octopus with big tentacles for ponds or gardens is swirling around his imagination.

“I want to do more and more of my own sculptures,” he said.

Bigfoot was a natural figure to make in the Pacific Northwest.

“It would be great to have by the driveway in the woods,” he said.

Every strand of hair is handcrafted, as is every muscle.

Under the fur are sculpted biceps and abs. Carrigan studied the brawny physiques of bodybuilders in an “Ironman” magazine he saved from 1992 to get the anatomy right for Bigfoot’s bod.

“If you look at a lot of large-sized sculptures, especially of Bigfoot, they all look kind of hokey,” he said. “And I don’t want this to look hokey.”

Bigfoot hokey? Uh, never.

See Sasquatch and more

“Oddmall: Emporium of the Weird” is 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday at Evergreen State Fairgrounds in Monroe.

Is there a person, place or thing making you wonder “What’s Up With That?” Contact reporter Andrea Brown: 425-339-3443; abrown@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @reporterbrown.

Talk to us

> Give us your news tips.

> Send us a letter to the editor.

> More Herald contact information.

More in Local News

Snohomish residents Barbara Bailey, right, and Beth Jarvis sit on a gate atop a levee on Bailey’s property on Monday, May 13, 2024, at Bailey Farm in Snohomish, Washington. Bailey is concerned the expansion of nearby Harvey Field Airport will lead to levee failures during future flood events due to a reduction of space for floodwater to safely go. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Harvey Field seeks to reroute runway in floodplain, faces new pushback

Snohomish farmers and neighbors worry the project will be disruptive and worsen flooding. Ownership advised people to “read the science.”

IAM District 751 machinists join the picket line to support Boeing firefighters during their lockout from the company on Thursday, May 16, 2024, in Everett, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Amid lockout, Boeing, union firefighters return to bargaining table

The firefighters and the planemaker held limited negotiations this week: They plan to meet again Monday, but a lockout continues.

Logo for news use featuring Snohomish County, Washington. 220118
Tacoma-based MultiCare’s partnership expands reach in Snohomish County

MultiCare and Overlake say they will “invest significantly to meet the growing health care needs of the Eastside and North Sound communities.”

A BNSF train crosses Grove St/72nd St, NE in Marysville, Washington on March 17, 2022. Marysville recently got funding for design work for an overcrossing at the intersection. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Eighth Street in Marysville closed 8 days for railroad repairs

The road was closed this week between Cedar Avenue and Delta Avenue in Marysville.

A mountain goats in the North Cascades east of Marblemount in August 2017. (Caleb Hutton / The Herald)
Ahead of grizzly arrival, wildlife advocates assess past translocations

Moving animals has helped struggling populations to rebound. And advocates point to past examples as evidence that “it’s not ethical to do nothing.”

Julie Timm
Sound Transit’s $375K payout to ex-CEO didn’t buy help

Board members said Julie Timm would give professional advice to them or a future CEO after leaving, but she hasn’t been called upon.

FILE -- An engine on a Boeing 767 jet aircraft, at a Boeing facility in Everett, Wash., March 7, 2012. The Boeing 737 engine that failed on Southwest Flight 1380 is not the only one that has caught the eye of regulators: Engines on Boeing's 787 Dreamliner and 767 have also failed, prompting questions about their design and inspection procedures. (Stuart Isett/The New York Times)
Boeing 767, built in Everett, gets 5-year lifeline from Congress

Boeing would have been forced to end production of the 767 Freighter in 2027 due to new emissions rules if not for the extension.

Snohomish County Jail. (Herald file)
Inmate, 51, dies at Snohomish County Jail

Around 3 p.m., corrections staff called 911 about an inmate, who became unresponsive as firefighters arrived. He died at the scene.

With the Olympic mountains in the background, Boeing's 777x lifts off from Paine Field on its first flight, to Boeing Field in Seattle, on Saturday, Jan. 25, 2020 in Everett, Wash. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
1 dead, dozens injured after turbulence on Boeing plane

A Singapore Airlines flight from London was diverted to Bangkok, where more than 70 people were being treated for injuries.

Two people fight on the side of I-5 neat Marysville. (Photo provided by WSDOT)
Idaho man identified in fatal trooper shooting on I-5 near Everett

The deceased man was Marvin Arellano, 31, of Nampa, Idaho, according to the Snohomish County Medical Examiner’s Office.

State Sen. Mark Mullet, left, and Attorney General Bob Ferguson, are both running as Democrats for governor in 2024. (Photos provided)
Did Bob Ferguson go too far responding to fellow Fergusons?

Ferguson wanted the secretary of state to redo the ballot. Mark Mullet, a Democratic rival, says such a move would’ve broken the law.

Photo by Gina Shields of GM Photography
Whidbey Island to salute the fallen for Memorial Day

All are invited to honor those who have fallen at three events on Whidbey Island.

Support local journalism

If you value local news, make a gift now to support the trusted journalism you get in The Daily Herald. Donations processed in this system are not tax deductible.