Ian Stobie (left), Jake Garza (second from left) and Ben Garrison, all of Puyallup, open-carry their guns on the steps of the Legislative Building as they attend a gun rights rally Jan. 12 at the Capitol in Olympia. (Ted S. Warren / Associated Press file)

Ian Stobie (left), Jake Garza (second from left) and Ben Garrison, all of Puyallup, open-carry their guns on the steps of the Legislative Building as they attend a gun rights rally Jan. 12 at the Capitol in Olympia. (Ted S. Warren / Associated Press file)

What actions by state lawmakers will influence your vote?

These proposals or accomplishments could reverberate next November. Tell us what you think.

OLYMPIA — Voters will get a chance to really shake up membership in the state Legislature this fall, if they are so inclined.

Possibilities for change abound with all 98 seats in the House and 25 seats in the Senate up for election.

Soon, we in the class of pundits will prognosticate on forces and factors that might influence the electorate and determine the outcome of contests.

One will be lawmakers’ decision to remove themselves from the duties of the state Public Records Act in favor of a separate and less rigorous disclosure protocol of their own design.

Thousands of Washingtonians aren’t happy about it and want Gov. Jay Inslee to veto the bill. As of 4 p.m. Wednesday, his office reported receiving more than 8,100 emails and more than 4,300 calls from people opposed. And The Herald editorial board has said that if the governor vetoes the bill, any lawmaker voting to override it will be disqualified from getting the paper’s endorsement.

This isn’t the only issue consuming the attention of lawmakers and the public, and won’t be the only one on voters’ minds.

Below are a few other things lawmakers have done or might do before the session ends March 8. I could use some help figuring out if any of these could be a deal-breaker for a voter.

Tell me, would any of these matters incite you to vote incumbents out of office or to keep them in?

Bump stock ban: It will soon be illegal to make, sell, own or possess a bump-fire stock, a plastic attachment that allows semiautomatic weapons to fire like fully automatic models. Under a bill making its way to the governor, the manufacture and sale of the devices is prohibited starting July 1. A year later, bump stocks will be considered contraband and in most instances subject to seizure by authorities.

Abortion mandate: This legislation would require health plans that cover maternity care or services to also cover the voluntary termination of pregnancy. And those plans must cover contraceptives. It’s been atop the agenda of the governor and Democrats in both chambers and is awaiting a vote in the House.

Same-day registration: You will soon be able to walk into a county auditor’s office on the day of an election, register as a voter then cast a ballot. This change will start with the November 2019 election under a bill heading to the governor’s desk.

Car tab relief: Lawmakers promised to ease the pain of soaring costs of car tabs in the Sound Transit taxing district. It hasn’t happened yet. The House and Senate each have an approach and are working to bridge the gap and keep their promise.

Eliminate the death penalty: This is close to happening but hasn’t yet. A bill to get rid of capital punishment passed the Senate. It is now in the House where its fate is unclear, as there are members who think voters should be given a chance to weigh in.

Buying military-style rifles: This is a work in progress. There is a new bill to require a person be at least 21 to buy a semiautomatic rifle and that a full state background check be done on those seeking to buy one of those rifles. Many Democrats would like to use their majorities in each chamber to get this through before time runs out.

Property taxes: In 2017, lawmakers increased the statewide property tax rate. In February, property owners got their bills and were shocked to see how much they owed. Members of both parties are devising a way to provide temporary relief this year or next. Meanwhile, this fall will be the first time lawmakers will be on the ballot since the increase took effect.

This is a short list. If your vote is going to be tied to something different, let me know.

It’ll help in developing accurate forecasts for the coming electoral season.

Jerry Cornfield: 360-352-8623; jcornfield @herald net.com. Twitter: @dospueblos.

Talk to us

More in Local News

The county canvassing board certifies election results at the Snohomish County Auditor’s Office in Everett, Washington on Tuesday, Nov. 28, 2023.  (Annie Barker / The Herald)
General election results stamped official by canvassing board

In Snohomish County, one hand recount will take place. Officials said ballot challenges were down this year.

The Days Inn on Everett Mall Way, which Snohomish County is set to purchase and convert into emergency housing, is seen Monday, Aug. 8, 2022, in Everett, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Over $130M for affordable housing set to be approved by County Council

The five-year investment plan of the 0.1% sales tax aims to construct 550 new affordable units.

Two snowboarders head up the mountain in a lift chair on the opening day of ski season at Stevens Pass Ski Area on Friday, Dec. 2, 2022, near Skykomish, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Ski season delayed at Stevens Pass due to minimal snow

Resort originally planned to open Dec. 1. But staff are hopeful this week’s snow will allow guests to hit the slopes soon.

Siblings Qingyun, left, and Ruoyun Li, 12 and 13, respectively, are together on campus at Everett Community College on Thursday, Oct. 19, 2023, in Everett, Washington. The two are taking a full course load at the community college this semester. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Siblings, age 12 and 13, are youngest students at EvCC campus

Qingyun Li was 11 when he scored a perfect 36 on the ACT test. His sister, Ruoyun, was one point away.

Edmond’s newly elected mayor Mike Rosen on Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2023 in Edmonds, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Mayor-elect Rosen wants to ‘make Edmonds politics boring again’

Mike Rosen handily defeated incumbent Mayor Mike Nelson. He talked with The Herald about how he wants to gather the “full input” of residents.

A speed camera facing west along 220th Street Southwest on Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2023 in Edmonds, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Traffic cameras, and tickets, come to Edmonds; Mukilteo could be next

New school zone cameras in Edmonds will begin operating in January. Mukilteo is considering enforcement cameras as well.

A person walks their dog along a flooded Old Snohomish Monroe Road on Tuesday, Nov. 16, 2021 in Snohomish, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Flood-resistant floors and sandbags are price of riverside life in Sultan

Flooding is a threat every year for 75,000 locals — and the long-term forecast suggests it’ll only get worse in the coming decades.

Lynnwood
3 men charged in armed home invasion near Everett

Prosecutors allege the trio targeted other Asian American homes across Snohomish, Whatcom and King counties.

Team members prep for the upcoming ski season at Stevens Pass Resort in Skykomish, Washington on Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2023.  (Annie Barker / The Herald)
Any day now: All eyes on snow forecast at Stevens Pass

The ski area was a flurry of activity this week, as staff made sure a new lift and app were running smoothly.

Everett
Carjacking suspects tracked via GPS from Everett to Renton, then arrested

A King County resident reported two people stole their Mercedes at gunpoint. Hours later, its GPS tracker pinged in north Everett.

Edmonds
Man sentenced for racist threats to Edmonds animal control officer

Sean Wagner spewed slurs at an officer who seized his dogs. He was sentenced to jail for a hate crime.

A sign in front of the AquaSox front office references the upcoming Everett City Council vote on a sum of $1.1 million to give to outside contractors to help upgrade a new stadium on Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2023 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Everett AquaSox stadium upgrade gets $1.1M green light from city

City officials want to keep the team in Everett. But will they play in a new stadium downtown in 2027? Or an updated Funko Field?

Support local journalism

If you value local news, make a gift now to support the trusted journalism you get in The Daily Herald. Donations processed in this system are not tax deductible.