Velma Aiken, the paternal grandmother of Kamiyah Mobley, who was kidnapped as an infant 18 years ago, gets a congratulatory hug from a family member after Mobley was found safe Friday. (Will Dickey /The Florida Times-Union)

Woman stolen at birth learns true identity; ‘Momma’ charged

Associated Press

WALTERBORO, S.C. — Stolen from a hospital just hours after she was born, an 18-year-old woman finally learned her true identity and was reunited Friday with her birth family, by video chat. The woman she thought was her mother was charged with her kidnapping.

Thanks to DNA analysis, the 18-year-old now knows her birth name: Kamiyah Mobley.

She’s in good health but understandably overwhelmed, Jacksonville Sheriff Mike Williams said.

Gloria Williams, 51, was arrested at her home in Walterboro, South Carolina, early Friday on charges of kidnapping and interference with custody.

Mobley — who was raised under her given name, Alexis Manigo — was allowed to spend a few emotional moments with Williams on Friday. She cried “Momma” through the caged window of a security door after Williams waived extradition to Florida, according to WXJT-TV, which posted a video online.

A much different scene was described by the young woman’s birth family. They cried “tears of joy” after a detective told them their baby had been found. Within hours Friday, they were able to reconnect over FaceTime.

“She looks just like her daddy,” her paternal grandmother, Velma Aiken, of Jacksonville, said after they were able to see each other for the first time. “She act like she been talking to us all the time. She told us she’d be here soon to see us.”

Mobley was only eight hours old when she was taken from her young mother by a woman posing as a nurse at University Medical Center. A massive search ensued, with helicopters circling the hospital and the city on high alert. Thousands of tips came in over the years, but she had disappeared.

All that time, Kamiyah’s neighbors in Walterboro knew her as Gloria Williams’ daughter.

“She wasn’t an abused child or a child who got in trouble. But she grew up with a lie for 18 years,” said Joseph Jenkins, who lives across the street.

Some months ago, the young woman “had an inclination” that she may have been kidnapped, the sheriff said. Authorities didn’t say why she suspected this.

The case broke thanks to a tip received by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, said Robert Lowery, a center vice president. He would not say from whom the tip came.

But the center soon reached out to the cold case detectives at the sheriff’s office, and Mobley provided a swab of her cheek for DNA analysis that proved the match, the sheriff said.

“This was something brand new to all of us,” said Tesha Stephens, a cousin of Williams’, who stood outside their home Friday evening.

The center has tracked 308 infant abductions since 1983 by nonfamily members in the U.S. Of those cases, 12 were still missing at the end of last month. That’s now one number smaller.

“Right now she’s holding up,” Stephens said. “She’s processing everything and she’s probably going to have to take this day-by-day.”

The woman has been provided with counseling, the sheriff said. Meanwhile, Aiken is thrilled to know that they can speak with each other as much as they want.

“I always prayed, ‘Don’t let me die before I see my grandbaby’,” Aiken said. “My prayer was answered.”

The family never forgot the little girl ripped from her mother’s arms that day in 1998.

Her mother, Shanara Mobley, told the Florida Times-Union newspaper on the 10th anniversary of the kidnapping that on every one of Kamiyah’s birthdays, she wrapped a piece of birthday cake in foil and stuck it in her freezer.

“It’s stressful to wake up every day, knowing that your child is out there and you have no way to reach her or talk to her,” Mobley told the paper in 2008.

Lakeshia Jenkins said Williams and the girl would often come over for cookouts in the yard, or join their family at a nearby water park. Kamiyah seemed to be well cared for, and “Ms. Williams, she seemed like a normal person,” Jenkins said.

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