Kent man accused of threatening Trump, synagogues, reporters

Agents found an arsenal of weapons and armor at his home on Wednesday.

A 27-year-old Kent man is in federal custody for allegedly making interstate threats in online posts regarding members of President Donald Trump’s family as well as ongoing threats to bomb synagogues and threats against media figures in Southern California.

The FBI, U.S. Secret Service and Kent Police arrested Chase Bliss Colasurdo without incident on Wednesday during a traffic stop, according to an U.S. Department of Justice news release. He has been charged with two counts of making interstate threats and had his first appearance on Thursday in U.S. District Court in Seattle. He remains in custody at the Federal Detention Center in SeaTac.

If found guilty as charged, Colasurdo could face up to five years in prison and three years of supervised release, according to the Department of Justice.

According to the criminal complaint, a member of the public in March reported to the FBI concerns about Instagram and other social media posts where Colasurdo threatened to execute Donald Trump Jr., and Jared Kushner, senior advisor to his father-in-law. Additionally, Colasurdo sent messages to five media organizations that he was going to execute the family member.

Los Angeles Police continue to investigate Colasurdo for cyberstalking and threatening to kill multiple Los Angeles-based news and media reporters.

Colasurdo posted a photo on Instagram showing a hand with a firearm pointed at the photo of a Trump family member. When initially contacted by law enforcement in March, Colasurdo claimed his social media accounts had been hacked.

Despite his statements that he was not responsible for the posts, Colasurdo continued to make threatening comments, specifically threats to members of the Jewish community, according to court documents. In one post he wrote it was time to start “bombing synagogues.” As law enforcement continued to track his activity, it became clear he was purchasing various items related to firearms such as a holster, bulletproof vest and ammunition.

Colasurdo attempted to purchase a Sig Sauer SP2022 9mm semi-automatic pistol on April 3 but was denied due to a flag entered by the U.S. Secret Service into the National Instant Criminal Background Check System. He made a payment at a Sportsman’s Warehouse and on April 16 received an email from the store confirming the refund of his $549 purchase.

Agents executed a state search warrant at Colasurdo’s Kent home on Wednesday and found the following items, according to court documents:

• Bulletproof baseball cap

• Level IIIA bulletproof vest T-shirt concealable kevlar body armor

• Level III rifle plates rifle armor

• Level II rifle armor backpack

• Concealable gun holster for a Sig Sauer SP2022 handgun

• Six boxes containing 50 rounds and another 345 rounds of 9mm ammunition

• 9mm firearm magazine loaded with rounds of 9mm ammunition

• Unloaded 9mm firearm magazine

• Firearm accessories, including optics and LED laser mounts

• Three firearm holsters

• Multiple airsoft firearms

• Night vision goggles

• Gas mask

• Nazi flag with swastika

• Framer portrait of Adolph Hitler

• Books including “Hitler’s Revolution” and “The Protocols of Learned Elders of Zion”

The criminal history of Colasurdo includes two arrests for assault on separate occasions in 2015. One involved the assault of a kickboxing business owner in Kirkland. He told the arresting officers he had smoked meth and marijuana and drank alcohol prior to the assault. As a result, officers took him to a hospital for treatment.

While at the hospital, Colasurdo grabbed at a police officer’s gun with his left hand attempting to remove the gun from the holster. Colasurdo’s right hand was handcuffed to the bed rail. The officer grabbed Colasurdo’s hand and Colasurdo tried to kick the officer in the face before hospital security helped the officer restrain him.

King County records show the assault case was diverted to King County Mental Health Court, and that Colasurdo pleaded guilty to multiple counts of fourth-degree assault and malicious mischief.

This story originally appeared in the Kent Reporter, a sibling paper to the Herald.

Talk to us

More in Northwest

FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, a female resident orca whale breaches while swimming in Puget Sound near Bainbridge Island, Wash., as seen from a federally permitted research vessel. The National Marine Fisheries Service has finalized rules to expand the Southern Resident orca's critical habitat from the Canadian border down to Point Sur, Calif., adding 15,910 square miles, (41,207 square kilometers) of foraging areas, river mouths and migratory pathways. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
Endangered southern resident orca numbers drop from 74 to 73

Since July 1, 2021, three whales died while two were born, officials said.

Logo for news use featuring Whidbey Island in Island County, Washington. 220118
Floatplane wreckage recovery in Puget Sound begins

The U.S. Navy will use a remotely operated vehicle Deep Drone 8,000, a barge and a crane in recovery efforts.

News logo for use with stories about coronavirus COVID-19 COVID
COVID, monkeypox levels down

State says prevention efforts will continue.

News logo for use with stories about coronavirus COVID-19 COVID
State employees likely to get 1K bonuses for COVID booster

Under a tentative deal state employees would get $1,000 bonuses for receiving a COVID-19 booster shot.

FILE - Then-Interim Seattle Police Chief Adrian Diaz addresses a news conference in Seattle, on Sept. 2, 2020. Seattle Mayor Bruce Harrell has named Diaz as his pick for permanent chief of the Seattle department. Harrell on Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2022,  announced his intent to appoint Diaz, who has served as interim police chief since 2020. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
Seattle mayor appoints Adrian Diaz as city’s police chief

Diaz has served as interim police chief since September 2020.

NO CAPTION. Logo to accompany news of Washington state.
Human remains wash ashore, possibly from floatplane crash

A female torso found near Sequim could be connected to a floatplane crash near Whidbey Island.

NO CAPTION. Logo to accompany news of Seattle.
Seattle teachers approve new contract following strike

Teachers in Seattle have approved a new, three-year contract following a strike.

X
West Seattle Bridge reopened Saturday night

After 908 days without a high-rise bridge, the drivers and passengers of West Seattle regained seven road lanes.

NO CAPTION. Logo to accompany news of Washington state.
Monkeypox cases declining in WA, outbreak trajectory unclear

The drop in infections statewide is directly linked to the drop in cases in King County.

Guillermo Carvajal, a member of the support staff at Northgate Elementary School in Seattle, and Erin Carroll, an occupational therapist there, picket outside the building on the third day of a strike by the Seattle Education Association on Friday, Sept. 9, 2022. The union and Seattle Public Schools continued negotiating over issued that include pay and support for special needs students. It remained unclear how long the strike might last. (AP Photo/Gene Johnson)
Tentative deal reached to end Seattle teachers strike

Seattle Public Schools said late Monday it had reached a tentative agreement with the union for teachers.

Logo for news use featuring Whidbey Island in Island County, Washington. 220118
Floatplane wreckage located in Mutiny Bay

Wreckage of a floatplane that crashed into Mutiny Bay last week has been located on the seafloor.

Logo for news use featuring Whidbey Island in Island County, Washington. 220118
Body of Whidbey Island plane crash victim identified

A body found near the site of a floatplane crash in Mutiny Bay has been identified as 29-year-old Gabby Hanna.