Ryan Warren Ward (left) looks over court papers with attorney Lane Wolfley during Ward’s sentencing for three counts of aggravated first-degree murder and multiple counts of theft and firearms violations on Thursday in Clallam County Superior Court in Port Angeles. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)

Ryan Warren Ward (left) looks over court papers with attorney Lane Wolfley during Ward’s sentencing for three counts of aggravated first-degree murder and multiple counts of theft and firearms violations on Thursday in Clallam County Superior Court in Port Angeles. (Keith Thorpe/Peninsula Daily News)

Man sentenced to life in prison in triple-murder

Ryan Warren Ward was the second defendant sentenced in the December 2018 slayings.

By Rob Ollikainen / Peninsula Daily News

PORT ANGELES — Ryan Warren Ward has been sentenced to life in prison with no possibility of parole for a triple homicide east of Port Angeles.

He was the second defendant to be sentenced this week for the December 2018 murders of Tiffany May, Jordan Iverson and Darrell Iverson at a residence on Bear Meadow Road.

Ward, 39, gave no statement in a somber sentencing hearing that featured photographs of the victims and remarks from six family members.

“You didn’t even give us the opportunity to say goodbye,” said Noreen Iverson, Jordan Iverson’s mother, facing Ward.

“How could you do such a cowardly thing?”

Dustin Iverson, Jordan’s brother and Darrell Iverson’s son, said Ward should have received the same sentence as the victims.

“You killed a little piece of a lot of people,” said Angela May, Tiffany May’s mother.

Ward pleaded guilty Thursday to three counts of first-degree aggravated murder and 16 other counts related to the theft, sale or illegal possession of firearms.

Darrell Iverson, 57, Jordan Iverson, 27, and Tiffany May, 26, were each shot multiple times outside Darrell Iverson’s rural home at 62 Bear Mountain Road in the early morning hours of Dec. 26, 2018, the Clallam County Sheriff’s Office said.

The bodies of the Iversons were found on New Year’s Eve by a relative who had not heard from them since Christmas.

The body of May, who was Jordan Iverson’s girlfriend, was found later that day in a folded position in a locked shed.

Kallie Ann LeTellier, 36, Dennis Marvin Bauer, 52, and Ward were each charged with three counts of first-degree murder for the killings.

LeTellier was sentenced Tuesday to 35 years in prison after pleading guilty to second-degree murder with a firearm enhancement for May’s death and agreeing to testify against her co-defendants.

Bauer is scheduled for a six- to eight-week trial on the triple murder beginning Jan. 4. He is being held in the Clallam County jail on $3.5 million bail.

said Bauer and LeTellier had concocted a plan to rob and kill the Iversons, with whom they were acquainted.

Reporter Rob Ollikainen can be reached at rollikainen@peninsuladailynews.com.

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