Law enforcement officers from multiple agencies execute a search warrant Friday afternoon at a house on the corner of 12th and Hendricks streets in Port Townsend. (Brian McLean / Peninsula Daily News)

Law enforcement officers from multiple agencies execute a search warrant Friday afternoon at a house on the corner of 12th and Hendricks streets in Port Townsend. (Brian McLean / Peninsula Daily News)

Musician’s death leads police to Port Townsend drug lab

The suspect allegedly said he sold drugs to “the cartel” and worked with the Aryan Brotherhood.

  • By Brian McLean Peninsula Daily News
  • Saturday, March 30, 2019 11:29am
  • Northwest

By Brian McLean / Peninsula Daily News

PORT TOWNSEND — A Port Townsend man has been arrested for investigation of felony controlled substances homicide following the death of another man, a well-known musician.

Adam Michael Kelly, 38, had a first appearance in Jefferson County Superior Court today, two days after a 43-year-old man was pronounced dead of an apparent drug overdose, according to the Port Townsend Police Department.

Jarrod Bramson, half of the music duo Solvents of Port Townsend, was found unconscious in his vehicle at Jefferson Healthcare hospital just after 8 p.m. Wednesday, police said.

Efforts to revive him were unsuccessful, police said.

Kelly also has been charged with possession with intent to manufacture or deliver a controlled substance and unlawful use of a building for drug purposes. He was being held today in the Jefferson County Jail in lieu of $500,000 bail.

Kelly is scheduled to be arraigned during a hearing at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday at the Jefferson County Courthouse, 1820 Jefferson St.

Sequence of events

According to the probable cause statement and police interviews, the following sequence of events occurred:

Kelly and Bramson had been in contact earlier in the day and agreed to meet at Kelly’s house in the 1400 block of 12th Street. When Bramson arrived, he appeared to be under the influence. The men went downstairs to the “dungeon,” a term Kelly’s girlfriend used to describe the area where she had seen a pill press and liquid drugs.

The woman, who was not identified in the report, said the liquids and pills were steroids, and she said Kelly told her he was a pioneer in the market. The woman said Kelly told her he sold drugs to “the cartel” and worked in a business partnership with the Aryan Brotherhood.

About 20 to 30 minutes after Bramson arrived, the woman said Kelly called her downstairs to help revive Bramson. She said Kelly retrieved two shots of Narcan, a compound that can counteract opioid overdoses, and Kelly injected them into Bramson, one into each leg.

The woman said Kelly rejected her suggestion to call 9-1-1.

The pair carried Bramson to Bramson’s car and drove him about five blocks to the hospital, where they left Bramson in the passenger seat of his running vehicle.

Hospital surveillance video showed Kelly and the woman walking away.

Search warrant

Further investigation led to a multi-agency response and the execution of a search warrant at Kelly’s home, where hazardous materials were found, police said.

An FBI bomb squad entered the home Thursday during the execution of a search warrant and found a clandestine lab setup, according to the probable cause statement. The bomb squad found four processing stations where chemicals were heated and processed, a pill press and two other locations set up to manufacture controlled substances, according to the statement.

Bags with a white powdery substance filled a mini-refrigerator in the room, and printing labels were located for a broad geographic area along with fake labels to conceal the identity of the items being shipped, according to the statement.

The bomb squad also found several guns and boxes of ammunition along with a tactical vest, according to the statement.

The Port Townsend Police Department is the primary investigating agency, with assistance from the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, East Jefferson Fire-Rescue, State Patrol SWAT, the FBI, Drug Enforcement Administration and the state Department of Ecology.

Singer, guitarist and songwriter Bramson’s partner in Solvents was Emily Madden. They often performed in Port Townsend, including during the Concerts on the Dock summer series and were next scheduled to perform on Saturday at the Pour House.

A gofundme page at https://tinyurl.com/PDN-bramsongofundme to help Bramson’s family with expenses had amassed $15,500 of a $30,000 goal today.

This story originally appeared in the Peninsula Daily News, a sibling paper of The Daily Herald.

Talk to us

More in Northwest

The Supreme Court in Washington D.C. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Supreme Court limits EPA in curbing power plant emissions

This impacts how the nation’s main anti-air pollution law can be used to reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

NO CAPTION. Logo to accompany news of Washington state.
Washington state license plates prices increase July 1

The price of a new plate will rise from $10 to $50, and replacing a lost plate will increase from $10 to $30.

Hundreds gather to listen to a lineup of guest speakers during Snohomish County’s “Bans Off Our Bodies” rally Saturday, May 14, 2022, outside the county courthouse in Everett, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade; states can ban abortion

The decision is expected to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states.

FILE - In this photo provided by the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, a crane and boats are anchored next to a collapsed "net pen" used by Cooke Aquaculture Pacific to farm Atlantic Salmon near Cypress Island in Washington state on Aug. 28, 2017, after a failure of the nets allowed tens of thousands of the nonnative fish to escape. A Washington state jury on Wednesday, June 22, 2022, awarded the Lummi Indian tribe $595,000 over the 2017 collapse of the net pen where Atlantic salmon were being raised, an event that elicited fears of damage to wild salmon runs and prompted the Legislature to ban the farming of the nonnative fish. (David Bergvall/Washington State Department of Natural Resources via AP, File)
Jury awards $595,000 to Lummi tribe for salmon pen collapse

The tribe sued, saying the pen owner had not reimbursed the tribal government for its clean up effort.

FILE - Alaska Airlines planes are parked at gates with Mount Rainier in the background at sunrise, on March 1, 2021, at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in Seattle. A union has reached a deal Wednesday, June 22, 2022, with Seattle-based Alaska Airlines for a two-year contract extension that provides substantial raises for 5,300 gate agents, stores personnel and office staff, as well as for ramp workers who load cargo. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
Alaska Airlines reaches contract deal with some workers

Raises for gate agents, stores personnel, office staff, as well as ramp workers who load cargo.

NO CAPTION. Logo to accompany news of Seattle.
Seattle facing $117 million revenue shortfall in 2023

The city’s budget chief says there’s no easy way to bridge the gap.

A view from the lower undeveloped part of the Flowery Trail neighborhood looking at spots where slash piles have been burned - outside Chewelah, Wash. (Erick Doxey / InvestigateWest)
Growing sprawl in state’s woods comes with high wildfire risk

Policymakers and homeowners are scrambling to manage the so-called “wildland-urban interface” to mitigate the threat.

The kids thought it was milk. It was actually floor sealant

In Juneau, containers of the chemical were stacked on the same pallet as boxes containing pouches of milk.

NO CAPTION. Logo to accompany news of Seattle.
Initiative to change Seattle elections heads toward ballot

The initiative would alter the way Seattle elects mayors, city attorneys and City Council members.

Lynnwood
Lynnwood climber supports first all-Black Mount Everest summit bid

Fred Campbell was part of the historic expedition, but got sick and had to turn back before the submit.

The A.J. Eisenberg Airport in Oak Harbor. (Karina Andrew / Whidbey News-Times)
Local pilot plans to buy Whidbey Island airport

Robert DeLaurentis, known as the “Zen Pilot,” submitted a letter of intent to purchase the A.J. Eisenberg Airport.