In this Dec. 18, 2017 photo, cars from an Amtrak train lay spilled onto I-5 below as some remain on the tracks above in DuPont. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, file)

In this Dec. 18, 2017 photo, cars from an Amtrak train lay spilled onto I-5 below as some remain on the tracks above in DuPont. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, file)

Seattle transit agency removes safety officer after crash

The decision was related to the Amtrak derailment on Sound Transit-owned tracks in DuPont in 2017.

Associated Press

SEATTLE — Seattle’s transit agency has removed its top safety officer as a result of a fatal 2017 train derailment.

The Seattle Times reported the Central Puget Sound Regional Transit Authority removed Salah Al-Tamimi as its chief executive safety and quality officer.

The agency better known as Sound Transit services the Seattle metropolitan area.

Sound Transit CEO Peter Rogoff says Al-Tamimi is on medical leave, but may be able to return in a lower-ranked position in another department.

Rogoff says the decision was related to a fatal Amtrak Cascades derailment on Sound Transit-owned tracks in DuPont in December 2017.

The National Transportation Safety Board placed primary blame on Sound Transit for failing to require safety improvements where the derailment occurred.

The derailment occurred on the first passenger trip through the $181 million corridor.

Three train passengers died and 57 passengers and eight people traveling on the I-5 highway were injured.

An Amtrak engineer missed at least one sign about a speed restriction and steered the train through a curve at nearly 80 mph in a 30 mph zone, causing railcars to fall onto I-5.

The NTSB says Amtrak, the Washington State Department of Transportation and the Federal Railroad Administration were also responsible for the crash.

More in Northwest

Snohomish County man is first US case of coronavirus

A man in his 30s was hospitalized in Everett after contracting the virus during a trip to China.

Legislature sees records requests spike since court ruling

House and Senate administrators in Washington are working through how to deal with the influx.

Ferry ridership drops due to snow, construction and options

Washington State Ferries saw a 3.2% decrease in 2019. A big factor was a February snowstorm.

Lawmakers brace for political battle over bullets and AR-15s

Bills banning assault weapons and high capacity magazines will receive public hearings this week.

Seattle Rep. Jayapal backs Bernie Sanders for president

The rising star in the Democrats’ liberal wing chose him over Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

State challenges extensive spending by bankrupt Tim Eyman

He’s been spending an average of nearly $24,000 a month over the past year.

Seattle officer fired over ‘threatening’ social media posts

Implied violence against former President Barack Obama, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Shea decries report saying he engaged in domestic terrorism

Police are looking into possible threats against the GOP leader who suspended Shea from the caucus.

US court dismisses suit by Oregon youths over climate change

The justices said ending the use of fossil fuels in the U.S. would not slow or stop climate change.

Most Read