Defiance Edition

They tried to make me go to rehab: Toronto Mayor Rob Ford is adamant that he will not step down and will fight calls for him to leave office following his admission that he smoked crack cocaine during “one of my drunken stupors.”

Contacted in his federal prison cell, former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich, D-Minimum Security, said, “I gave up way too easily.”

Hootin’ and hollerin’: The Hooters restaurant in Portland, Ore., hosted an after-season party for a middle school football team, even after the coach was fired when he refused the school district’s order to move the party elsewhere. Former coach Randy Burbach thought Hooters was appropriate and refused to back down.

Freed from his coaching contract, Burbach said he now plans to move to Toronto and run for deputy mayor.

How do you look in a touque, Kirby? Former state Republican chairman Kirby Wilbur is standing by his tweets that women protesting at an immigration reform rally in Bellevue were “hags and witches” and “old and ugly.”

Wilbur, R-Irrelevant, who is looking for work, also was checking into Canadian citizenship requirements.

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Editorial cartoons for Friday, June 11

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Medical assistant Andreea Marian, right, gives a COVID-19 vaccine to Gabina Morales at a clinic at PeaceHealth St. Joseph Medical Center Thursday, June 3, 2021, in Bellingham, Wash. Washington is the latest state to offer prizes to encourage people to get vaccinated against COVID-19, with Gov. Jay Inslee on Thursday announcing a series of giveaways during the month of June that includes lottery drawings totaling $2 million, college tuition assistance, airline tickets and game systems. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
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A vaccine’s protection should be enough, but to get more vaccinated, incentives can and do work.

FILE - In this April 12, 2018, file photo, a marijuana plant awaits transplanting at the Hollingsworth Cannabis Company near Shelton, Wash. Five years after Washington launched its pioneering legal marijuana market, officials are proposing their most ambitious overhaul yet of the way the industry is regulated, with plans for boosting minority ownership of pot businesses, spreading out oversight among a range of state agencies, and letting the smallest cannabis producers increase the size of the operations in an effort to help them become more competitive. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
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