Gray wolves, also known as timberwolves, were once nearly hunted out of existence in the 48 contiguous United States but are bouncing back. Their numbers have grown from less than 700 in 1960 to more than 6,000 at the end of 2010. Currently there are an estimated 80 to 90 in Washington state, in the eastern part of the state and the Cascade Range. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service photo)

Editorial: Closer look needed at state’s policy on killing wolves

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