Federal grant to hire police a win for Everett

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Thank you for The Herald’s Sept. 2 editorial urging the Everett City Council to accept a federal grant of up to $6 million, which will continue to bolster Everett’s very visible, positive and community-oriented policing efforts. I would especially like to thank Mayor Cassie Franklin for her successful efforts in Washington, D.C., to secure this grant.

This is a big win for our community. It is a recognition of the Everett Police Department’s constructive approach in getting to know both the neighborhoods and people it serves.

These federal dollars enable the police department’s successful bicycle patrols to expand beyond downtown and into South Everett neighborhoods. It enables improved response times, and, in neighborhoods where speeding and other dangerous issues have sparked complaints for years, it supports more traffic patrols.

As you noted in your editorial, acceptance of this grant does not commit the city to additional spending. The council will decide how much to draw from the grant, and thus will control decisions regarding local dollars spent for equipment or training.

Especially in these challenging budget times, Mayor Franklin and Police Chief Dan Templeman deserve our gratitude for putting Everett in a position to win such a large, important and necessary infusion of federal dollars. Thank you for your leadership and your continued work to make public safety our first priority.

Chris Adams

Everett

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