Legislation would support sales of electric vehicles

Washington citizens have an opportunity to help address an important issue in our communities: the effect of air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions on our health.

As a physician, I know there are direct links between air pollution and multiple human diseases including asthma and other respiratory conditions, many cardiovascular diseases including heart attacks and strokes, diabetes, and also various neurologic disorders. In Washington state most carbon pollution comes from cars and trucks. Individuals living near our freeways and other transportation corridors are at particular high risk. In addition to impacting our health, these fossil fuel emissions degrade our environment and contribute significantly to the climate crisis that threatens us all.

Fortunately, we have an opportunity to address these issues and to set Washington state on the path toward a clean transportation future. A bill in the legislature, Clean Cars 2030, does just that. House Bill 1204 would set a goal that all passenger and light-duty vehicles of model year 2030 or later registered in Washington state be electric vehicles. Passing Clean Cars 2030 would both help fight climate change and improve our environment while having the immediate benefit of improving our health. For these reasons I urge you to contact your Washington state representatives and senator and urge them to strongly support passage of this legislation.

For more information about Clean Cars 2030 go to tinyurl.com/CleanCars2030

Jonathan Witte

Washington Physicians for Social Responsibility

Everett

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