North Whidbey Fire levy increase has many benefits

  • North Whidbey Fire levy Levy increase has many benefits By Wire Service
  • Wednesday, August 19, 2020 1:30am
  • OpinionLetters

The Board of Fire Commissioners for North Whidbey Fire and Rescue recently approved a resolution asking voters to consider a 15-cent fire levy lid lift on the November ballot. The lid lift would fund replacement of two fire engines, radio equipment and self-contained breathing apparatus for our firefighters. The additional cost for the owner of a $370,000 home (an average for our area) would be approximately $4.63 per month.

NWFR has the lowest fire levy rate in the county. The lid lift would allow us to pay cash instead of financing these purchases which would cost more due to interest payments. It also will help us maintain our community insurance rating, which is linked to what many home and business owners pay in insurance premiums.

Call volumes have increased to the point that these items need replacing for the safety of our community and its firefighters. Because our fire levy rate is low, we are unable to fund them out of our existing budget.

More information can be found on our website at www.nwfr.org. Chief John Clark also is available to answer questions at 360-675-1131 or chiefclark@nwfr.org. We welcome your questions, and thank you for considering our request.

Marvin Koorn, chairman

North Whidbey Fire and Rescue

Oak Harbor

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