Qualified immunity in police shootings should end

No one is above the law in the United States of America. Is that still true? Because looking at how police shootings are handled, it seems as though police officers are an exception.

Since 2005, out of 13,000 deadly police shootings, only 106 officers have been charged with homicide and only four have been convicted of murder: virtually no accountability, thanks to a loophole called qualified immunity which allows bad cops to legally trample on our rights.

The Equal Protection Clause in the Constitution says “nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.”

Qualified immunity tosses that out the window and places those who are meant to uphold the law above it. It’s high time we ended this.

Paul Shafransky

Sedro Woolley

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