Schwab: No useful debate to be had if we can’t agree on facts

By Sid Schwab

Think we’re overtaxed? Over-regulated? We can talk.

If it’s your opinion that public education has problems and you have ideas, it’s conversable. If you believe our country is heading in the wrong direction, let’s debate. Which direction, especially. We could have a conversation about military vs. social spending, and where the balance is; to what extent each protects us. I’ve even had almost room-temperature excursus about why, in successful societies, people care for one another.

However.

If you believe the planet isn’t warming, or humans have nothing to do with it, or it’s not serious, there’s no point in wasting your time or mine. If you deny evolution or feel sure the earth is only 6,000 years old, or flat, I’ll defend your right to such beliefs, but they announce the impossibility of fruitful back-and-forth. Likewise if you think homosexuality is a choice.

I suppose we could discuss whether tax cuts pay for themselves, but we wouldn’t get far.

The need to reject indisputable facts is something that puzzles me about humans. In our evolutionary history, gut feelings no doubt played an important role in survival. React first, analyze later; it got us a long way. So — several hundred thousand years ago — did prehensile tails, the vestiges of which we all retain, occasionally causing coccygodinia.

According to polls, 40 percent of Republicans are certain Russian election interference is fake news created by liberals to distract Trump from his job. This they believe despite knowing every relevant intelligence agency has concluded otherwise and, shown the evidence, so has every member of involved congressional committees, Democrat and Republican. Of Republican voters who acknowledge it occurred, most seem undisturbed. (In a recent challenge, American hackers broke into voting machines in minutes.)

In political fora, many Republicans insist our economy didn’t tank until Obama took over, and continued to decline throughout his presidency. Presenting them with indisputable facts makes no difference. The best hope is that such people are trolling. Otherwise it’s a serious mental defect of information processing, the same kind that rejects unwelcome news as fake. In theory, voting presumes the ability to evaluate data; this broad-based dismissal of evidence by a major political party is ominous.

I don’t think 40 percent of Republicans are innately stupid or unable to learn new things. In fairness, they’ve been victimized by intentional disinformation for decades, so it’s not entirely their fault (New York Times: tinyurl.com/lies4you). Whatever the explanation, because it requires both sides accept basic facts, rational discourse has become all but impossible. If political beliefs are a mutable hodge-podge, especially in a messy democracy like ours, facts are not. For propaganda to take root, there must be fertile soil. In that, Democrats are a raised-bed backyard garden. Today’s Republicans are a corporate farm. Our democracy was designed by men who didn’t imagine such a divide was possible.

Aided by clever gerrymandering, Republicans dominate state and federal legislatures. In many red states, not unlike the U.S. Senate (and the current president, thanks to the quirky Electoral College), Republicans received fewer votes than Democrats. And those elected tend to be the most rigid denialists. If it were true, as third-party nihilists argue, that there’s no difference between Democrats and Republicans, it wouldn’t matter. But when one’s adherents are consistently disdainful of facts, and when its leaders count on that instead of winning on ideas, a pathologically lying president who considers the White House “a dump” and lies about Boy Scout phone calls is what happens.

The White House revolving door happens. An EPA following the law only by court order, its scientists resigning (tinyurl.com/bye2epa), happens. Incoherent foreign and domestic policy by tweet, Pizzagate, Seth Rich fake Fox “news” allegedly pushed by the president all happen; a president who’s made it impossible to believe anything he says. Happens. The Republican Prevaricare farce happens (Lindsey Graham called it a disaster and a fraud. And voted for it.)

Ironically, the same information-processing deficiency that allowed Trump’s voters to disregard his lifelong moral and ethical failings, his businesses based on inherited (and laundered?) money and swindling, caused them not to reckon how incapable of governing he’d be (Guardian: tinyurl.com/no2gov).

His ineptitude is the only thing saving us, so far, from dictatorship. Or worse. The arch-conservative NRO gets it (National Review: tinyurl.com/NROgetsIT). Republican Sen. Jeff Flake, too (Politico: tinyurl.com/not-a-flake).

Who’s got next?

Email Sid Schwab at columnsid@gmail.com.

Talk to us

> Give us your news tips.

> Send us a letter to the editor.

> More Herald contact information.

More in Opinion

toon
Editorial cartoons for Friday, July 12

A sketchy look at the news of the day.… Continue reading

Vote 2024. US American presidential election 2024. Vote inscription, badge, sticker. Presidential election banner Vote 2024, poster, sign. Political election campaign symbol. Vector Illustration
Editorial: Return Peterson, Ortiz-Self to House seats

The 21st district Democrats, each seeking a sixth term, are practiced and effective lawmakers.

Schwab: Trump can disavow Project 2025, but he’ll still use it

A wish list of ultra-conservative dreams, the revolution ‘will be bloodless,’ if we just go along with it.

AI offers opportunities to aid veterans

As artificial intelligence (AI) innovation continues to evolve, new applications for this… Continue reading

Investing in Herald’s staff will return investment

We have all watched with a mix of horror and sadness the… Continue reading

Krugman: The disconnect between good economy and bad attitude

With consumer numbers and opinion generally up, narratives explain our assumptions about how things are.

Comment: Next president could shift balance of 3-3-3 high court

After an eventful term, the court’s moderate conservatives may pause its to-do list. But an election looms.

toon
Editorial cartoons for Thursday, July 11

A sketchy look at the news of the day.… Continue reading

Comment: To protect our children’s future, reject I-2109

Ending the capital gains tax for the wealthy would cut billions of dollars in funding for children’s benefit.

Herald readers rely on its coverage of sports, more

The Everett Herald has always done a fantastic job of highlighting and… Continue reading

Comment: Hurricane Beryl wants a word with Texas climate deniers

Even before hurricane season, the state led the U.S. in billion-dollar disasters and insurance costs.

Stephens: Biden’s decline isn’t a crime; his handlers’ cover-up is

Biden, by insisting only he can defeat Trump, becomes more like the man he opposes.

Support local journalism

If you value local news, make a gift now to support the trusted journalism you get in The Daily Herald. Donations processed in this system are not tax deductible.