Wasn’t the market supposed to prevent baby formula shortage?

Have you listened to the outrage regarding the baby formula shortage. At FDA. At Biden administration?

How many of the outraged people are usually anxious to keep government out of business because the market knows best? How many were against a near monopoly by three companies controlling over 90 percent of the product, or were against antitrust laws that restricted business? How many thought government overreach was involved when a plant was closed for a contaminated product that could have harmed or killed babies?

Now, how many changed their attitude and think it is the government’s responsibility to provide this baby formula to consumers by telling business exactly how to run their operations, or buy some from other countries?

Bill Severson

Stanwood

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