Were Boeing profits that irresistible to keep 737 Max flying?

In what was later described as a “culture of concealment,” Boeing’s decision to keep its ill-fated 737 Max planes flying — regardless of indicators, including employee warnings that they should be grounded and serious software glitches corrected — resulted in 346 ticket-buyers suffering a most horrific death.

Yet, couldn’t those same Boeing decision-makers and/or their young families also potentially be flying on one of its ill-fated flights?

Assuming the CEOs are not sufficiently foolish to believe their loved-ones will somehow always evade such repercussions related to the former’s reckless decisions, I wonder whether the profit objective of a CEO’s job-description nature is somehow irresistible to him or her?

It brings to mind the allegorical fox stung by the instinct-abiding scorpion while ferrying it across the river, leaving both to drown.

Frank Sterle Jr.

White Rock, B.C.

Talk to us

More in Opinion

Ian Terry / The Herald

Brian Henderson, of Renton, plugs in his Kia Soul EV electric vehicle at a charging station in Sultan on Wednesday, June 7. Henderson and a group of fellow electric car drivers made the trip from Everett's City Hall to Spokane's City Hall late last week in an effort to raise awareness about convenient charging locations along U.S. Highway 2.

Photo taken on 06072017
Editorial: Yes to gas tax hike, but this has to be the last

Transportation needs must be funded, but the gas tax is dwindling as a sustainable revenue source.

toon
Editorial cartoons for Monday, Jan. 25

A sketchy look at the news of the day.… Continue reading

Arlington Fire Chief Dave Kraski outside Station #46 downtown. (Arlington Times)
Editorial: Arlington voters should approve fire agency merger

Merger of its fire department with North County Fire will maintain those services affordably.

The U.S. Capitol building is prepared for the inauguration ceremonies for President-elect Joe Biden as the "Field of Flags" are placed on the ground on the National Mall on Monday, Jan. 18, 2021. in Washington, DC. Approximately 191,500 flags will cover part of the National Mall and will represent the American people who are unable to travel to Washington, for the inauguration. (Joe Raedle/Pool vias AP)
Editorial: The oath we must take after every election

We can’t address solutions to our challenges until we accept the election of those who represent us.

FILE - In this Feb. 26, 2009 file photo, a pressman pulls a copy of one of the final editions of the Rocky Mountain News off the press in the Washington Street Printing Plant of the Denver Newspaper Agency in Denver. A survey by Gallup and the Knight Foundation released on Sunday, Nov. 17, 2019, finds Democrats much more willing than Republicans to see government funding help local news sources. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
Editorial: Restating our commitment to discourse and debate

To move beyond the last four years’ divisiveness, we need more discussion from varied viewpoints.

Amanda Gorman speaks at the inauguration. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Jonathan Newton
Comment: Why Amanda Gorman’s poem at inaugural soared

Forced to overcome a speech impediment, the young poet has excelled at performance of the spoken word.

Comment: How Senate can keep filibuster but break gridlock

A return to ‘regular order’ would move legislation forward that has bipartisan support in committees.

We have to confront white supremacy in our own communities

In June of last year, after the killing of George Floyd and… Continue reading

Suggested names for groups at the Capitol siege

To the lexicon of names for groups like a plague of Llocusts… Continue reading

Most Read