Jim Bouton, the former Seattle Pilots and New York Yankees pitcher who shocked the conservative baseball world with the tell-all book “Ball Four,” died Wednesday. He was 80. (Associated Press)

Jim Bouton, the former Seattle Pilots and New York Yankees pitcher who shocked the conservative baseball world with the tell-all book “Ball Four,” died Wednesday. He was 80. (Associated Press)

Original Seattle Pilot, ‘Ball Four’ author Bouton dies at 80

His tell-all book was a best-seller and shocked the baseball world.

Associated Press

GREAT BARRINGTON, Mass. — Jim Bouton, the former Seattle Pilots and New York Yankees pitcher who shocked and angered the conservative baseball world with the tell-all book “Ball Four,” has died. He was 80.

Bouton’s family said he died Wednesday at the home he shared with wife Paula Kurman. He fought a brain disease linked to dementia and was in hospice care. Bouton also had two strokes in 2012.

Published in 1970, “Ball Four” detailed Yankees great Mickey Mantle’s carousing, and the use of stimulants in the major leagues. Bouton’s revealing look at baseball off the field made for eye-opening and entertaining reading, but he paid a big price for the best-seller when former teammates, other players and executives across the big leagues ostracized him for exposing their secrets.

Throwing so hard that his cap flew off his head, Bouton was 21-8 with six shutouts in 1963 — his second season in the majors — and went 18-13 with four more shutouts in 1964.

Bouton injured his right arm in 1965, going 4-15 that season, and saw limited action the next three seasons with New York. He worked on “Ball Four” in 1969, a season spent with the expansion Seattle Pilots and Houston Astros, his fastball replaced by a knuckleball as he tried to prolong his career.

Bouton also pitched for Houston in 1970, and made a comeback with the Atlanta Braves in 1978, going 1-3 at age 39. He finished his 10-year career with a 62-63 record and 3.57 ERA.

Bouton was a television sportscaster in New York City with WABC and WCBS, wrote other books and starred in a 1976 CBS sitcom based on “Ball Four” that lasted only five episodes. He and a former teammate developed Big League Chew, a bubble gum alternative to chewing tobacco.

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