Julie Muhlstein

Jay Priebe, who grew up in foster care, is chief executive officer of Hand in Hand. The nonprofit operates Safe Place, an Everett facility that houses children removed from homes by law enforcement or social workers. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

Hand in Hand’s new Safe Place a better shelter for children

The Everett nonprofit’s leader grew up in foster care. The agency serves kids removed from their homes.

 

Coffee’s free, so is the banter at retired dairymen’s hangout

Every morning except Sunday, the Craven brothers invite Snohomish Valley farm friends to join them.

 

Everett’s Jason Webley and other performers in the Flotsam River Circus plan to float this hand-built craft from Corvallis, Oregon, to Portland. It’s pictured here on the Snohomish River. Webley is standing on the rooftop. (Photo by Lou Daprille)

Artistry afloat: Jason Webley takes to the river in Oregon

On a hand-built boat, Everett troubadour and his troupe will perform free shows on the Willamette.

 

Everett’s Patrick Hall was among people who put up signs in March to save the Longfellow School building. He is now part of an advisory task force looking at options for the building, which the Everett School District had planned to tear down. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

Everett’s old Longfellow building beats wrecking ball for now

A task force is weighing options for the old school, where plans were made to put up a parking lot.

Everett’s Patrick Hall was among people who put up signs in March to save the Longfellow School building. He is now part of an advisory task force looking at options for the building, which the Everett School District had planned to tear down. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Andrew Abt is back and forth, from the kitchen to the sales counter, at Monroe’s Sky River Bakery Tuesday. He and his wife Mary Thorgerson have all they can handle and would like to sell the bakery and retire. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

‘The Hub of Main Street,’ Monroe bakery may soon change hands

After 32 years, Sky River bake shop’s owners are hoping to retire. “This is how your grandmother baked.”

Andrew Abt is back and forth, from the kitchen to the sales counter, at Monroe’s Sky River Bakery Tuesday. He and his wife Mary Thorgerson have all they can handle and would like to sell the bakery and retire. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Lynnwood’s Jin So, who came from South Korea in the 1970s, talks about President Donald Trump’s step across the DMZ into North Korea last weekend. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

They see hope for homeland in Trump’s visit to North Korea

He lives in Lynnwood now, but Jin So’s eyes were on the Korean Peninsula during presidential meeting.

Lynnwood’s Jin So, who came from South Korea in the 1970s, talks about President Donald Trump’s step across the DMZ into North Korea last weekend. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

Kaboom! Marysville’s Fourth fireworks show a first in decades

Fire agency reports fewer incidents since city’s ban on personal pyrotechnics took effect in 2017.

For her 100th birthday party, Teresa Schmierer celebrated at Everett’s 24 Hour Fitness with her water aerobics class. She’s been going to water aerobics since she turned 76. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

At 100, Navy nurse who served in WW II still making a splash

“She has that inner joy,” Teresa Schmierer’s daughter says. Her mom wows friends at water aerobics.

For her 100th birthday party, Teresa Schmierer celebrated at Everett’s 24 Hour Fitness with her water aerobics class. She’s been going to water aerobics since she turned 76. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
At the end of a rousing performance of the song “You Are Holy,” Faith Fitch (left) and Angelina Nesterenko end with a high-five. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

Adults with special needs are All Aboard talent show’s stars

A larger meeting place is on the wish list for agency that offers activities and builds friendships.

At the end of a rousing performance of the song “You Are Holy,” Faith Fitch (left) and Angelina Nesterenko end with a high-five. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Tiffany Teasdale, co-owner of Lynnwood Gun & Ammunition, talks about new requirements that take effect Monday, due to voters’ approval of Initiative 1639. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

Gun-storage provisions and the rest of I-1639 kick in Monday

New laws don’t require that firearms be kept in a safe, but owners should know the rules and risks.

Tiffany Teasdale, co-owner of Lynnwood Gun & Ammunition, talks about new requirements that take effect Monday, due to voters’ approval of Initiative 1639. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Staff who’ll be overseeing kids at Camp Killoqua this summer sing a song Thursday thanking donors to a capital campaign that raised almost $2.2 million for local Camp Fire programs. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

‘A jewel,’ Camp Killoqua spruced up by $2.1 million in gifts

Donors visit lodge to celebrate end of a capital campaign that will help more kids enjoy Camp Fire.

Staff who’ll be overseeing kids at Camp Killoqua this summer sing a song Thursday thanking donors to a capital campaign that raised almost $2.2 million for local Camp Fire programs. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

On last day with kids, special ed teacher says they’re a gift

Monroe High School’s Susan Dow spent more than four decades helping her students find their niche.

Wobble, a 27-year-old bison whose home was a pasture between Ebey Slough and Sunnyside Boulevard, died of natural causes on May 29. Born prematurely, he lived his whole life on Paul and Ruth Brandal’s 70-acre property. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

Lone bison died where he lived, a Sunnyside Blvd. pasture

He was a landmark. Wobble grew from 26-pound preemie into 1,800-pound beast where a herd once roamed.

Wobble, a 27-year-old bison whose home was a pasture between Ebey Slough and Sunnyside Boulevard, died of natural causes on May 29. Born prematurely, he lived his whole life on Paul and Ruth Brandal’s 70-acre property. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Now retired, Arthur Skodal (center) pays a visit to his sons, who now head Skotdal Real Estate. With him, in their glassy 12th-floor headquarters in the Key Bank Tower, are Craig Skodal (left) and Andy Skodal. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

‘Can’t ask for a better dad’: Men tell stories of four fathers

A judge, a farmer, real estate firm owners and a coffee company head talk of following in footsteps.

Now retired, Arthur Skodal (center) pays a visit to his sons, who now head Skotdal Real Estate. With him, in their glassy 12th-floor headquarters in the Key Bank Tower, are Craig Skodal (left) and Andy Skodal. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
Stephanie Griffith (second from left), a longtime teacher at Maltby Elementary School, died of cancer in May 2018. Pictured here, in 2006, are friends from Spokane’s Ferris High School class of 1972, (from left) Kristy Hopkins Kunkle, Stephanie Griffith, Julie Muhlstein and Linda Jovanovich.

Graduates: Cherish your friendships. I treasure mine.

Stephanie Griffith, who taught kindergarten in Monroe, was beloved by students and Spokane girlfriends.

Stephanie Griffith (second from left), a longtime teacher at Maltby Elementary School, died of cancer in May 2018. Pictured here, in 2006, are friends from Spokane’s Ferris High School class of 1972, (from left) Kristy Hopkins Kunkle, Stephanie Griffith, Julie Muhlstein and Linda Jovanovich.
Keynote speaker Greg Lewis addresses WorkSource Youth Center graduates and guests Monday night at EvCC’s Henry M. Jackson Conference Center. Lewis used his football experience to illustrate how to handle obstacles by changing one’s game plan. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

‘You did it’: WorkSource grads encouraged to take next step

Matthew Colson, who was killed by a hit-and-run driver in Marysville, was honored at the GED ceremony.

Keynote speaker Greg Lewis addresses WorkSource Youth Center graduates and guests Monday night at EvCC’s Henry M. Jackson Conference Center. Lewis used his football experience to illustrate how to handle obstacles by changing one’s game plan. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

Veteran from Marysville will speak out against gun violence

Ray Miller to focus on vets’ suicides at Sunday rally in Seattle that’s part of Wear Orange Weekend.

Crowds were out Sunday at the Everett Farmers Market despite a new $2 parking fee imposed by the Port of Everett. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

$2 to park at Everett Farmers Market, and new site is coming

More paid parking could be in the future as the Port of Everett’s waterfront projects are completed.

Crowds were out Sunday at the Everett Farmers Market despite a new $2 parking fee imposed by the Port of Everett. (Dan Bates / The Herald)
John Hinchcliffe, who served with the 1st Infantry Division on D-Day, is buried at Tahoma National Cemetery in Kent. Some of his ashes were scattered at Omaha Beach in France. (Contributed Photo)

A D-Day hero has passed, but his family keeps memory alive

John Hinchcliffe, of Lake Stevens, was part of the first wave to storm Omaha Beach on June 6, 1944.

John Hinchcliffe, who served with the 1st Infantry Division on D-Day, is buried at Tahoma National Cemetery in Kent. Some of his ashes were scattered at Omaha Beach in France. (Contributed Photo)
Dr. Suzanne Poppema’s horse, Lochinvar takes a treat from her hand, Friday at a Snohomish riding facility where she keeps him and rides him regularly. Poppema, 71, was an abortion provider before retiring five years ago. She has been a long-time advocate for womens’ access to abortion. She is worried about rights currently threatened. (Dan Bates / The Herald)

Then and now, Edmonds doctor a defender of abortion rights

Some states’ strict laws worry Dr. Suzanne Poppema, who performed the procedure for 20-plus years.

Dr. Suzanne Poppema’s horse, Lochinvar takes a treat from her hand, Friday at a Snohomish riding facility where she keeps him and rides him regularly. Poppema, 71, was an abortion provider before retiring five years ago. She has been a long-time advocate for womens’ access to abortion. She is worried about rights currently threatened. (Dan Bates / The Herald)