Singer-songwriter Lee Brice will be Saturday’s headliner at this year’s Festival of the River in Arlington. (Associated Press file)

Singer-songwriter Lee Brice will be Saturday’s headliner at this year’s Festival of the River in Arlington. (Associated Press file)

Special surprise at 30th Festival of the River: free parking

Lee Brice and Boz Scaggs are the headliners at this year’s event, set for Aug. 10-11 in Arlington.

The 30th anniversary of the Stillaguamish Tribe’s annual Festival of the River and Pow Wow is this weekend, and organizers have a special gift for attendees.

Parking is free this year. Admission, as always, also is free.

“We’re trying to let people know we appreciate them coming for the last 30 years,” festival director Pat Stevenson said. “We wanted it to be as painless as possible so the community can enjoy themselves.”

The event is set for Aug. 10-11 at River Meadow County Park in Arlington, and this year’s lineup is as good as it’s ever been, Stevenson said.

Lee Brice, a chart-topping country singer-songwriter, and Boz Scaggs, a Grammy Award-winning blue-eyed soul singer-songwriter, are headlining the two-day festival.

Other main stage performers will include War (funk, soul, jazz-rock), Big Brother and the Holding Company (acid rock), Thompson Square (country) and Snohomish’s own Megs McLean (country-rock-grunge). In addition, more than a dozen other local and regional acts will perform on another nearby stage.

The event will also feature a pow wow with dancing and drumming, environmental exhibits, Native storytellers, a logging show, children’s activities and the Stilly 5K Fun Run through the park.

The Festival of the River began in 1989 as a way to spread the word about environmental stewardship and the Stillaguamish River watershed, and share Native American culture.

Festival attendance spiked in 2007, when about 12,000 people came to see well-known bands, including Jefferson Starship and The English Beat.

Big-name acts have been performing there ever since, which has helped cast a larger net for environmental outreach, Stevenson said.

Saturday’s headliner, Lee Brice, will perform at 8 p.m. The country musician’s biggest hits include “A Woman Like You,” “Hard to Love,” “I Drive Your Truck” and “I Don’t Dance,” which topped the Billboard Hot Country Songs between 2011 and 2014.

He’s also signed to Curb Records, which includes the likes of Tim McGraw, LeAnn Rimes and Hank Williams Jr.

Blue-eyed soul singer-songwriter Boz Scaggs, known for his Grammy Award-winning R&B song “Lowdown” from 1977, will headling Sunday night. (Associated Press file)

Blue-eyed soul singer-songwriter Boz Scaggs, known for his Grammy Award-winning R&B song “Lowdown” from 1977, will headling Sunday night. (Associated Press file)

Boz Scaggs will headline Sunday at 8 p.m. Scaggs won a Grammy Award for Best R&B Song in 1977 for “Lowdown,” while he’s also known for “Lido Shuffle,” his 1976 album, “Silk Degrees” and for writing ballads influenced by rock, blues and R&B.

Megs McLean, a Snohomish native, will perform Aug. 10 at the 30th annual Festival of the River in Arlington. (Kirk Stauffer)

Megs McLean, a Snohomish native, will perform Aug. 10 at the 30th annual Festival of the River in Arlington. (Kirk Stauffer)

McLean, 22, of Snohomish, will perform with her band at 4 p.m. Saturday on the main stage. The Glacier Peak High School graduate established her signature sound of country, rock and grunge — known as “crunge” — in 2016 with her debut single, “It’s My Truck.”

“Today, people are taking different approaches to country music,” she said. “This is my own approach to country music, since I grew up listening to Metallica, Pearl Jam and stuff like that.”

The song earned her recognition as one of the top 10 “Next Women of Country” on Spotify. She’s since opened for country stars such as Martina McBride, Clint Black and Sara Evans, including a performance at the Tulalip Amphitheatre during the 2018 Tulalip Summer Concert Series.

McLean described her most recent single, “Frisky,” as Southern pop-rock, with a strong groove, country guitar riffs and a keyboard solo.

“I’m super-proud of it because it took three years to write,” she said. “It’s got a really cool beat that is very easily danceable and makes you want to bop.”

Evan Thompson: 425-339-3427, ethompson@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @ByEvanThompson.

If you go

The Stillaguamish Tribe’s 30th annual Festival of the River is Aug. 10-11 at River Meadows County Park, 20416 Jordan Road, Arlington.

The festival features live music, pow wows, a fun run, storytelling tent and logging show. Here is the main stage performance schedule:

Saturday

10:30 a.m. Peter Ali & Swil Kanim

12:30 p.m. Low Down Drifters

2 p.m. Lost at Last

4 p.m. Megs McLean

5:30 p.m. Thompson Square

8 p.m. Lee Brice

Sunday

10:30 a.m. Peter Ali & Swil Kanim

12:30 p.m. Yellow Bird Dancers

2 p.m. Chris Eger

4 p.m. Big Brother and the Holding Company

5:30 p.m. War

8 p.m. Boz Scaggs

Talk to us

More in Life

The mask of an employee who returned to the office during the normalization period after corona virus quarantine, stands in front of the keyboard. Top view. Turkey.
What seniors can expect as new normal in a post-vaccine world

Here’s a preview of post-vaccine life for older Americans, from medical care to grocery shopping.

The trick to 1892 East’s crispy French toast is a combination of cornflakes and buttery palmiers, which add great crunch and rich flavor. (Bob Chamberlin/Los Angeles Times/MCT)
Is your bread stale? Don’t throw it away; make this treat

Cornflake French toast might seem a bit of a gimmick, but the added crunch is a marvel.

The Washington State Wine Commission is using August, known for decades as Washington Wine Month, to promote the Drink For WA campaign. The commission estimates it will generate 12 million impressions through advertising and social media channels. (Photo courtesy Washington State Wine Commission)
Washington wine commission rolls out Drink for WA campaign

Share an image of your special occasion along with tags of #DrinkForWA and #EatForWA.

It only takes a small amount of cash to build a homemade swamp cooler to make your home comfortable this summer. (Jennifer Bardsley)
Can a do-it-yourself swamp cooler beat the August heat?

Instead of spending $400 for an air conditioner, purchase $25 of simple parts and assemble one yourself.

Fried green tomatoes stand in fro fresh red tomatoes in this BLT sandwich. (Gretchen McKay/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette/TNS)
Make a fried green tomato BLT when you can’t wait for ripe

Firmer than red tomatoes, with a zingy, slightly sour taste, unripe tomatoes hold their shape.

Talking to stuffed animals and other lessons of COVID-19

Teddy bears are a source of comfort and can be a sounding board for something we are trying to express.

AI-enhanced EKGS may speed heart failure diagnosis, treatment

The devices aid in screening for cardiac dysfunction in people with confirmed or suspected COVID-19.

Thai Chicken Kabobs with Noodles. (Linda Gassenheimer/TNS)
This super-easy Thai-inspired dish has a slightly spicy edge

Peanut sauce flavors these Thai chicken kabobs with noodles.

Frozen blueberries team up with banana and yogurt to make a refreshing summer smoothie. (Gretchen McKay/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette/TNS)
Make the most of your fresh-picked blueberries this summer

They can play a starring role in so many recipes, and we’re not just talking dessert- and breakfast-type dishes.

Most Read