Environment

A floating offshore wind turbine platform is part of a six-turbine, 50 megawatt wind farm off the coast of Aberdeen, Scotland. (Starkraft)

Editorial: Answer for environment, maritime jobs blowing in wind

Floating offshore wind farms could be a boon for maritime employers like Everett’s Dunlap Towing.

 

Beating the heat in their lawn chairs at Lake Roesiger County Park in July 2018, when a hot streak began, were Sonny Taulbee (left) his wife, Carissa and daughter, Ashlyn, 14.  (Dan Bates / The Herald)

Lake Roesiger property owners to pay fee to clean invasive plants

Snohomish County Council voted 4-1 on a new service charge, dividing the cost among 463 shoreline properties.

 

A young red-tailed hawk takes a moment in a nearby tree after being released from a carrier Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2022, at Evergreen Cemetery in Everett, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Red-tailed hawk gets ‘second chance’ in release at Evergreen Cemetery

The hawk, found about three weeks ago, was likely hit by a car. PAWS rehabilitated the young bird.

 

Solar panels are visible along the rooftop of the Crisp family home on Monday, Nov. 14, 2022 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Breaking it down: How consumers can cash in on federal climate bill

Tax credits and discounts on electric vehicles are among many incentives to help consumers save money and the planet.

Solar panels are visible along the rooftop of the Crisp family home on Monday, Nov. 14, 2022 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Members of the search and rescue team who extracted hiker Benedict Delahunty from the Enchantments after he became trapped under a boulder in October sit outside their helicopter Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022, at Taylor’s Landing in Snohomish, Washington. The team includes, from left, chief pilot Bill Quistorf, crew chief Randy Fay, rescue technician Ryan Fleming, flight medic Jeff Brown and pilot Steve Klett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Crushed under boulder, hiker recounts harrowing rescue in Enchantments

A Snohomish County helicopter crew braved wind, smoke and more to save Benedict Delahunty, 28, of Montana, from the side of a cliff.

Members of the search and rescue team who extracted hiker Benedict Delahunty from the Enchantments after he became trapped under a boulder in October sit outside their helicopter Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2022, at Taylor’s Landing in Snohomish, Washington. The team includes, from left, chief pilot Bill Quistorf, crew chief Randy Fay, rescue technician Ryan Fleming, flight medic Jeff Brown and pilot Steve Klett. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
A North American Beaver sits in a trap placed by Tulalip Tribe Natural Resources at Naval Radio Station Jim Creek, Washington, Oct. 12. The Tulalip Beaver Project relocates "nuisance" beavers from (sub)urban areas to hydrologically impaired tributaries in the upper Snohomish Watershed for the improvement of fish rearing habitat and fresh water storage. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ethan Soto)

For beavers, tall dams don’t always make good neighbors

Naval Station Everett and the Tulalip Tribes teamed up to remove a family of beavers. Now, they’re restoring salmon habitat.

A North American Beaver sits in a trap placed by Tulalip Tribe Natural Resources at Naval Radio Station Jim Creek, Washington, Oct. 12. The Tulalip Beaver Project relocates "nuisance" beavers from (sub)urban areas to hydrologically impaired tributaries in the upper Snohomish Watershed for the improvement of fish rearing habitat and fresh water storage. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Ethan Soto)
Smoke from the Bolt Creek fire silhouettes a mountain ridge and trees just outside of Index on Sept. 12, 2022. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Work begins to stabilize Bolt Creek burn scar for winter weather

A U.S. Forest Service report released last week identified several high-risk areas for landslides and flooding.

Smoke from the Bolt Creek fire silhouettes a mountain ridge and trees just outside of Index on Sept. 12, 2022. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
FILE - In this photo provided by the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, a crane and boats are anchored next to a collapsed "net pen" used by Cooke Aquaculture Pacific to farm Atlantic Salmon near Cypress Island in Washington state on Aug. 28, 2017, after a failure of the nets allowed tens of thousands of the nonnative fish to escape. A Washington state jury on Wednesday, June 22, 2022, awarded the Lummi Indian tribe $595,000 over the 2017 collapse of the net pen where Atlantic salmon were being raised, an event that elicited fears of damage to wild salmon runs and prompted the Legislature to ban the farming of the nonnative fish. (David Bergvall/Washington State Department of Natural Resources via AP, File)

State won’t renew leases for Puget Sound fish farms

Cooke Aquaculture has until Dec. 14 to wrap up steelhead farming and begin deconstructing their equipment.

FILE - In this photo provided by the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, a crane and boats are anchored next to a collapsed "net pen" used by Cooke Aquaculture Pacific to farm Atlantic Salmon near Cypress Island in Washington state on Aug. 28, 2017, after a failure of the nets allowed tens of thousands of the nonnative fish to escape. A Washington state jury on Wednesday, June 22, 2022, awarded the Lummi Indian tribe $595,000 over the 2017 collapse of the net pen where Atlantic salmon were being raised, an event that elicited fears of damage to wild salmon runs and prompted the Legislature to ban the farming of the nonnative fish. (David Bergvall/Washington State Department of Natural Resources via AP, File)
FILE - This April 29, 2019 file photo provided by the United States Geological Survey shows a grizzly bear and a cub along the Gibbon River in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. Wildlife advocates are seeking a court order that would force U.S. officials to consider if grizzly bears should be restored to more Western states following the animals' resurgence in the Northern Rockies.  (Frank van Manen/The United States Geological Survey via AP,File)

Editorial: Give grizzlies chance to return to North Cascades

A shelved proposal to reintroduce the bears to the state’s wilderness has resumed with four hearings.

FILE - This April 29, 2019 file photo provided by the United States Geological Survey shows a grizzly bear and a cub along the Gibbon River in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. Wildlife advocates are seeking a court order that would force U.S. officials to consider if grizzly bears should be restored to more Western states following the animals' resurgence in the Northern Rockies.  (Frank van Manen/The United States Geological Survey via AP,File)
A demonstrator holds a sign reading "climate justice" at a Fridays for Future protest calling for money for climate action at the COP27 U.N. Climate Summit, Friday, Nov. 11, 2022, in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Editorial: What 1.5 degrees means for climate change fight

It’s a warning and a goal that we and our leaders must meet with a balance of alarm and optimism.

A demonstrator holds a sign reading "climate justice" at a Fridays for Future protest calling for money for climate action at the COP27 U.N. Climate Summit, Friday, Nov. 11, 2022, in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
The Granite Falls Bridge on the Mountain Loop Highway. (Snohomish County) 20211120

Mountain Loop Highway to close Wednesday

The popular road east of Granite Falls and south of Darrington is blocked off each year in line with winter weather.

The Granite Falls Bridge on the Mountain Loop Highway. (Snohomish County) 20211120
More than a dozen local leaders gather around to discuss short and long-term needs during a meeting addressing the environmental, safety and economic impacts of the Bolt Creek fire on Thursday, Oct. 27, 2022, at Bubba’s Roadhouse in Sultan, Washington. In attendance were State and U.S. politicians, the mayors of several Highway 2 towns, and other leadership from Snohomish and King counties (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

‘We’ve seen this coming’: Sky Valley plans for next Bolt Creek-scale fire

U.S. 2 has long needed improvements, but the “unprecedented” blaze lit a fire under policymakers, so to speak.

More than a dozen local leaders gather around to discuss short and long-term needs during a meeting addressing the environmental, safety and economic impacts of the Bolt Creek fire on Thursday, Oct. 27, 2022, at Bubba’s Roadhouse in Sultan, Washington. In attendance were State and U.S. politicians, the mayors of several Highway 2 towns, and other leadership from Snohomish and King counties (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
The Everett Wastewater Treatment Plant along the Snohomish River on Thursday, June 16, 2022 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

State fines Everett $13K for incompletely treated wastewater

The city has 30 days to pay or appeal the penalty. If it pays, the money goes to water quality restoration projects.

The Everett Wastewater Treatment Plant along the Snohomish River on Thursday, June 16, 2022 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Bill Pearson, 78, takes a walk through the rain at Hibulb Lookout — one of his favorite spots — while nursing a latte from Bargreen’s on Friday, Oct. 21, 2022, in Everett, Washington. A lifelong Washingtonian, save a few years in the Army, Pearson said he feels more comfortable getting outside during the milder months. “This is my time of year,” he said, gesturing to the clouds and rain. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Rain brings smoke relief, but risk of slides in Bolt Creek aftermath

Everett’s air quality index dropped from 250 to 31. But after a long dry spell, burned forest could cause problems on U.S. 2.

Bill Pearson, 78, takes a walk through the rain at Hibulb Lookout — one of his favorite spots — while nursing a latte from Bargreen’s on Friday, Oct. 21, 2022, in Everett, Washington. A lifelong Washingtonian, save a few years in the Army, Pearson said he feels more comfortable getting outside during the milder months. “This is my time of year,” he said, gesturing to the clouds and rain. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Cranes at the Port of Everett, which normally make up a larger skyline, are barely visible from the staircase at Howarth Park on Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022, in Everett, Washington. Wildfire smoke has been choking the region, but forecasts calling for rain mean the haze may finally clear in the coming days. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

About time for a smoke break: October rain to wash away wildfire haze

“We’ve seen smoke, we’ve seen wildfires, but we’ve never seen what happens after this long without rain.”

Cranes at the Port of Everett, which normally make up a larger skyline, are barely visible from the staircase at Howarth Park on Thursday, Oct. 20, 2022, in Everett, Washington. Wildfire smoke has been choking the region, but forecasts calling for rain mean the haze may finally clear in the coming days. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
People throw sticks for their dog along Edgewater Beach while a ferry emerges from smoke covering Possession Sound on Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2022 in Mukilteo, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

‘Worst I’ve ever seen it’: As smoke floods region, Darrington AQI tops 450

Wildfire smoke blanketed the region in one last hurrah Wednesday. Meteorologists predict weekend rains will bring relief.

People throw sticks for their dog along Edgewater Beach while a ferry emerges from smoke covering Possession Sound on Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2022 in Mukilteo, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
The ecological goal for Blue Heron Slough, upper right, is to restore tidal channels, marsh, and mud flats by breaching old agricultural dikes as seen at Smith Island at left. Shot on Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019 in Everett, Wa. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Puget Sound salmon habitat restored with tribes leading the way

At 353 acres, the Port of Everett’s Blue Heron Slough restoration project is among the largest along the Puget Sound.

The ecological goal for Blue Heron Slough, upper right, is to restore tidal channels, marsh, and mud flats by breaching old agricultural dikes as seen at Smith Island at left. Shot on Tuesday, Jan. 15, 2019 in Everett, Wa. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
NO CAPTION. Logo to accompany news of Washington state.

Olympic National Park bans fishing due to low river levels

The National Park Service announced it would halt all recreational fishing starting Thursday.

NO CAPTION. Logo to accompany news of Washington state.
FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, a female resident orca whale breaches while swimming in Puget Sound near Bainbridge Island, Wash., as seen from a federally permitted research vessel. The National Marine Fisheries Service has finalized rules to expand the Southern Resident orca's critical habitat from the Canadian border down to Point Sur, Calif., adding 15,910 square miles, (41,207 square kilometers) of foraging areas, river mouths and migratory pathways. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)

Endangered southern resident orca numbers drop from 74 to 73

Since July 1, 2021, three whales died while two were born, officials said.

FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, a female resident orca whale breaches while swimming in Puget Sound near Bainbridge Island, Wash., as seen from a federally permitted research vessel. The National Marine Fisheries Service has finalized rules to expand the Southern Resident orca's critical habitat from the Canadian border down to Point Sur, Calif., adding 15,910 square miles, (41,207 square kilometers) of foraging areas, river mouths and migratory pathways. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
Smoke from the Bolt Creek fire silhouettes mountain ridge and tree layers just outside of Index on Monday, Sept. 12, 2022. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Scientists: Warming climate ‘loads the dice’ for wildfire in west Cascades

Heat plus spark times wind times fuel equaled a 9,440-acre wildfire. Record heat made the Cascades ripe for a fire like Bolt Creek.

Smoke from the Bolt Creek fire silhouettes mountain ridge and tree layers just outside of Index on Monday, Sept. 12, 2022. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)