Everett Clinic saline study could expand coronavirus testing

Polyester swabs and saltwater are reliable substitutes for harder-to-find materials, the study found.

EVERETT — For weeks, public health experts have expressed frustration over a shortage of both swabs for coronavirus tests and the liquid in which the swabs are stored for transport.

Help may be on the way, in the form of saltwater.

A recently released Everett Clinic study tested 50 people and found widely available polyester swabs and saline solution are just as reliable as the current testing materials that are in short supply.

“This study further refines … research showing how a simple, patient-administered test can effectively and efficiently test for COVID-19 infections,” Dr. Yuan-Po Tu, who led the study, said in a news release.

On Thursday, the Food and Drug Administration updated its testing guidelines to allow the new testing materials. The study’s findings could be a positive step toward more widespread testing, which Gov. Jay Inslee has said will be necessary for social distancing measures to be relaxed.

“This will help us maximize our supplies so as we expand testing capacity, we are not limited in being able to take samples,” Everett Clinic spokesman Sam Templeton said in an email.

This is the second coronavirus study at the Everett Clinic to change federal rules for testing.

In March, Dr. Tu also found a testing method that lets patients swab themselves was just as accurate as clinician-administered tests.

Meanwhile, 4,000 at-home testing kits were shipped in the last month throughout King County as part of a separate study.

The Greater Seattle Coronavirus Assessment Network sent swab kits for people to self-administer and then send back to testing labs. The goal was to gauge the level of infection in the county over an 18-day period, which started March 23.

More tests are being sent out to continue the study. You must be a King County resident to qualify.

To date, the FDA hasn’t approved any form of at-home COVID-19 testing.

But King County’s self-swab study could be another step toward relaxing social distancing, King County Health Officer Dr. Jeff Duchin said.

“We think this is a really great proof of concept that home testing can work,” he said.

Duchin also said the Everett Clinic study was “very encouraging.”

“Right now, we continue to face shortages of testing materials and reagents,” he said. “Everything that comes on now as a new innovation — that’s appropriately validated and compared as close as we can to a gold standard — would be welcome.”

Joey Thompson: 425-339-3449; jthompson@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @byjoeythompson.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Norton Playfield, a three-acre play field owned by Housing Hope on Thursday, July 23, 2020 in Everett, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Vote nears on Housing Hope’s Everett playfield project

The Everett City Council will deliberate Wednesday on the multi-family, supportive housing proposal.

Driver hits, critically injures pedestrian in Everett

A driver hit a male who ran across the road Saturday night but stayed there and spoke with police.

Marysville School Districts' McKinney-Vento & Foster Care Liaison Deanna Bashour (left to right) Andrea Wyatt, Larisa Koenig and Rosemary Peterson on Thursday, Oct. 15, 2020 in Marysville, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
A new haven of help for homeless students in Marysville

“You name it, if they need it, we’ve got it,” says the Connections Center’s foster care liaison.

The USS Michael Monsoor has been a recent frequent visitor at Naval Station Everett. (Sue Misao / The Herald)
New Navy ship visits Everett base while training near Canada

The USS Michael Monsoor may visit a few more times before it leaves at the end of October.

Pedestrian seriously injured in hit-and-run in Everett

He was expected to survive. A 31-year-old woman was later booked into jail as a suspect.

Everett man who fled scene of hit-and-run fatality sentenced

“I just panicked is all,” said Thomas Rock, who was sentenced to 3 years and 5 months in prison.

Kush Mart on Evergreen Way on Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020 in Everett, Wash.A public hearing and vote to increase the city-imposed cap to eight stores (five are allowed and open now) is scheduled for the City Council on March 18. The state allows up to 10 in Everett. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
City council votes to allow more marijuana shops in Everett

Allowing three more stores, for total of eight, will promote healthy competition, city council members said.

Ian Terry / The Herald

An abandoned car sits on flooded Mann Road in Sultan on Friday, Nov. 13, 2015.

Photo taken on 11132015
County considers raising roads to skirt flooding near Sultan

Ben Howard Road and Mann Road are in line for culverts and elevation gains.

Most Read