Republican state Rep. Matt Shea (center) sits on the House floor with Republican colleagues during the State of the State address by Gov. Jay Inslee in January 2019 in Olympia. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, file)

Republican state Rep. Matt Shea (center) sits on the House floor with Republican colleagues during the State of the State address by Gov. Jay Inslee in January 2019 in Olympia. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, file)

Matt Shea is a man without a caucus. But he has a House seat

Whether Democrats try to expel the GOP lawmaker will be a hot topic in the upcoming session.

OLYMPIA — We’ll soon know where Rep. Matt Shea will be assigned to sit in the 2020 legislative session.

How long the Republican lawmaker will keep his seat on the House floor is, for now, less certain.

Shea, you recall, is an ordained rabble rouser from Spokane Valley accused in a House-sanctioned investigation of engaging in an act of domestic terrorism, intimidating political enemies and training young adults to fight a Holy war.

That report penned by a former FBI special agent and a former Houston cop sketches a damning portrait of the six-term lawmaker as a diviner of divisive thought whose political and spiritual activism sow among his followers a deep distrust of authority and open, and sometimes armed, discord with those with whom they disagree.

“Although this investigation found no evidence that Representative Shea presents an imminent direct threat to any individual or group,” the authors begin in their conclusion, “it is more probable than not that Representative Shea is likely to plan, direct and engage in additional future conflicts that could carry with them significant risk of bloodshed and loss of life. It is the professional opinion of the investigators, that on a more probable than not basis, Representative Shea presents a present and growing threat of risk to others through political violence.”

Rep. Matt Shea (left) gestures as he gives a speech in front of the liberty state flag Feb. 15, 2019, at the Capitol in Olympia. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Rep. Matt Shea (left) gestures as he gives a speech in front of the liberty state flag Feb. 15, 2019, at the Capitol in Olympia. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Many of the 57 House Democrats — including incoming House Speaker Laurie Jinkins, D-Tacoma, — read the report and concluded they wanted to see Shea expelled. But to kick out a sitting member requires a two-thirds vote of the chamber. That means getting at least nine GOP colleagues to join in and that’s unlikely any time soon.

Shea declined to be interviewed for the report and has vowed to not resign.

His presence will test Jinkins’ talents as speaker and try Rep. JT Wilcox’s continued reign as leader of the House Republican Caucus.

Jinkins is the first House speaker not named Frank Chopp in a generation. She reached this pinnacle of power with a promise of openness and the backing of minority, progressive and LGBTQ members of the Democratic caucus, some of whom have been vocal on wanting Shea out.

Nothing’s decided on what to do, Jinkins said Tuesday. “I need to have a conversation with my caucus,” she said.

There are options. A committee could hold a public hearing on the report and its findings.

Democrats could vote on expulsion. If it failed they could at least claim to have all 98 House members on the record. Democrats could pass a measure to censure Shea since it would only require a majority.

Several Democratic lawmakers may hold a news conference in the session’s early days to call publicly for expulsion.

“We are not demanding anything. Our caucus is not divided on this,” said Rep. Lillian Ortiz-Self, D-Mukilteo. “Our statement is more to make sure that everybody he attacked, spoke out against or sought to limit their rights, knows that our caucus says it is not okay. If there are not the votes, we don’t do it. There are plenty of other consequences.”

Rep. Lillian Ortiz-Self

Rep. Lillian Ortiz-Self

Ortiz-Self is willing to vote on expulsion even knowing it won’t succeed.

“What concerns me is if we don’t act, if we don’t make a statement and if we don’t stand up for everyone he’s attacked,” she said. “That concerns me.”

On the Republican side, Wilcox is dealing with his own Shea-related headaches.

On the day the report came out, Shea got booted from the caucus, stripped of his committee assignments and ousted from his seat on the House floor amid the rest of the Republican members. There’s even been a cleansing of ties to the caucus on his legislative web page. The suspension was handed down by the caucus eight-person leadership team.

House Republican Leader J.T. Wilcox, left) and caucus chair Rep. Paul Harris talk to the media Dec. 19 in Olympia. Wilcox has called on Republican Rep. Matt Shea to resign following an investigative report that found he took part in “domestic terrorism” against the United States during a 2016 standoff at a wildlife refuge in Oregon. (AP Photo/Rachel La Corte)

House Republican Leader J.T. Wilcox, left) and caucus chair Rep. Paul Harris talk to the media Dec. 19 in Olympia. Wilcox has called on Republican Rep. Matt Shea to resign following an investigative report that found he took part in “domestic terrorism” against the United States during a 2016 standoff at a wildlife refuge in Oregon. (AP Photo/Rachel La Corte)

At the time, Wilcox said Shea “absolutely should resign” and his role as a House Republican “is over.”

Political supporters of Shea are pushing back. They contend the report isn’t fair or balanced. They want the lawmaker reinstated to the caucus and a few are petitioning to get Wilcox replaced.

Some GOP lawmakers contend their caucus leaders acted too fast in punishing Shea and are distancing themselves from the decision.

“Rep. Matt Shea was punished by my House leadership team. NOT the House caucus team, but the house leadership team. Was that fair?” wrote Rep. Robert Sutherland, R-Granite Falls, in a Jan. 5 Facebook post “Was due process afforded Rep. Shea? I for one do not feel it was fair, nor was Rep. Shea afforded due process. That’s my opinion.”

In an interview the following day, Sutherland said he’s not opining on the merits of the allegations. “I just feel the process was rushed. I think we need to give him a reasonable amount of time to respond before acting,” he said.

Robert Sutherland

Robert Sutherland

Sutherland, who is in his first term, said he has no plans to push for the full caucus to reconsider the suspension.

“I have voiced my opinion,” he said. “I think other representatives are now concerned that we didn’t know anything.”

House Republican leaders aren’t likely to walk back their action. Nor are they inclined to support expelling Shea absent new revelations, or actions by a law enforcement agency. (The report was forwarded to the FBI.)

“I don’t sense a large amount of dissension within our caucus,” Wilcox said. “I do think it was important for House Republicans to express our sense that the things detailed in the report do not reflect our values as a caucus.”

Lawmakers convene a 60-day session Monday. Conversations on Shea could carry on the entire time.

We know, at least on Day One, Shea will have a seat somewhere.

Jerry Cornfield: 360-352-8623; jcornfield@herald net.com. Twitter: @dospueblos

Talk to us

More in Local News

A Port Angeles police officer cordons off an empty lot in Sequim on Thursday as law enforcement officials investigate an incident in the area. (Michael Dashiell/Olympic Peninsula News Group)
Man arrested in Sequim, connected to homicide, has Snohomish County ties

A dead woman was found in Bret Allen Kenney’s home, police say. He previously attacked Snohomish County Jail guards.

LOCAL - MOUNTAIN LOOP HIGHWAY
HERALD STAFF PHOTO BY JENNIFER BUCHANAN
PHOTO SHOT 062208
A car makes its way through a winding unpaved section of the Mountain Loop Highway 15 miles outside of Darrington.
14-mile scenic stretch of Mountain Loop Highway opens early

The highway between Granite Falls and Darrington reopened to traffic on Friday due to good weather.

Britney Barber, owner of Everett Improv. Barber performs a shows based on cuttings from The Everett Herald. Photographed in Everett, Washington on May 16, 2022. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Cut this paper up and have a laugh at Everett Improv

The troupe’s new recurring “Boozie Newzie” show is based off clippings from The Daily Herald. Meta, dude.

HIdden River Middle School (Monroe School District)
Monroe school employee on leave for ‘racially insensitive language’

The incident took place at Hidden River Middle School. Also, police were investigating racist vandalism found at another school.

Svetlana Kravchenko appears in court for her sentencing Thursday, May 19, 2022, at the Snohomish County Courthouse in Everett, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Everett woman gets community service in 2019 fatal hit-and-run

Svetlana Kravchenko was required to stay at the scene after hitting and killing Te Nguyen, 83. Instead, she went home.

A tiny homes program that opened in early July began with each unit claimed and a wait list of 60. Here Patrick Diller, head of community partnerships for Pallet, discusses the Pallet Shelter Pilot Project on June 29, 2021 in Everett. (Katie Hayes / Herald file)
Everett marks $2.7 million in federal funds for homeless housing

With the American Rescue Plan money, the city’s small housing program for unsheltered people could expand to three sites.

WSDOT workers open up the Smokey Point Rest Area on Tuesday, May 17, 2022 in Arlington, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Free coffee will be back soon at Smokey Point rest areas

Everett’s Silver Lake rest area for southbound I-5 drivers remains closed while WSDOT works on the facility.

Everett
Pro skateboarding competition coming to Everett in August

Street League Skateboarding’s championship tour will be at Angel of the Winds arena for two days.

Drivers heading north on Interstate 5 will take a detour from Highway 104 to 220th Street SW and back to I-5 this weekend during nightly lane closures for Sound Transit light rail work. (Sound Transit)
Light rail work closing I-5 North lanes nightly this weekend

Crews need to close northbound lanes between 220th Street SW and Highway 104. Drivers have two detour options.

Most Read