Ryan Hauge, Sophia Hauge and Rowan Hauge are assisted by Simran Takhar as they check out devices for school work March 18 at Henry M. Jackson High School in Mill Creek. All high school students and most middle school students already have a laptop or tablet, thanks to voters supporting the Everett Public Schools’ technology levy in 2016. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Ryan Hauge, Sophia Hauge and Rowan Hauge are assisted by Simran Takhar as they check out devices for school work March 18 at Henry M. Jackson High School in Mill Creek. All high school students and most middle school students already have a laptop or tablet, thanks to voters supporting the Everett Public Schools’ technology levy in 2016. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Weeks after schools close, some are logging back in to learn

Districts across the state are expected to offer online learning. Locally, those plans differ.

EVERETT — School is back in session, virtually, for some districts across Snohomish County.

Since Gov. Jay Inslee ordered all schools in the state to close earlier this month to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, districts have been working on creative ways to provide meals and childcare to students who depend on them. The state Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction, which oversees education in Washington, expects all public school districts to have an online learning plan in place by Monday.

“It’s not going to replace the typical ‘child in the classroom’ and I don’t think anybody intended it to,” Snohomish School District Superintendent Kent Kultgen said during a news conference Friday. “Logistically, it’s very complex.”

Kultgen’s district, like many others, has spent the last two weeks pairing students with laptops and internet hot spot devices. A thousand devices went out to students, he said, but that hasn’t solved technology issues.

It’s difficult to track how many students are checking in online, how much time they spend on school work, and whether work should be graded, he said. The situation will evolve over the weeks.

“As educators, we know we’ll tackle these problems,” he said. “Education next Friday may not look like what it looks like today.”

In the Northshore School District, teachers are expected to roll out their distance learning program on Monday.

A laptop, charger and mobile hotspot are handed over from Everett Public Schools staff to parents and students March 18 at Henry M. Jackson High School in Mill Creek. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

A laptop, charger and mobile hotspot are handed over from Everett Public Schools staff to parents and students March 18 at Henry M. Jackson High School in Mill Creek. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

The emphasis will be on connecting with students and providing schoolwork they can get started on, the district said in a letter to families.

Northshore’s plan also comes with a schedule families can follow to provide structure to learning, the district said.

Not all local districts are making the jump to a fully online curriculum.

That isn’t the expectation, said Katy Payne, a spokeswoman for the state agency.

“We believe most districts will be using a combination of media to provide learning opportunities for their students,” she said.

For some districts, it could be instruction through books, workbooks, phone, paper packets, video conferences or videos, she said. For others, it could be contacting families, setting up regular check-ins with students, surveying what resources they have at home, and working to fill any gaps.

Parents and students wait outside Henry M. Jackson High School on March 18 to check out devices for school work in Mill Creek. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Parents and students wait outside Henry M. Jackson High School on March 18 to check out devices for school work in Mill Creek. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

In Marysville, concerns about student equity led administrators to stop short of a fully-online curriculum, the district’s website said. Students and their parents can still find review materials and other learning resources on the district website.

For high school seniors across the county, the focus is on filling graduation requirements.

In Snohomish, staff are working with each 12th-grader individually to ensure they earn enough credits.

At the same time, they may miss academic milestones.

Gov. Inslee’s order to close schools lasts until April 24, but could be extended.

“What will graduation ceremonies look like?” Kultgen asked. “Will we even have a graduation ceremony?”

Joey Thompson: 425-339-3449; jthompson@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @byjoeythompson.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Logo for news use featuring the municipality of Lake Stevens in Snohomish County, Washington. 220118
Body found in impounded car in Lake Stevens

In June, Bothell police impounded the vehicle. Last week, a Lake Stevens business found a body inside.

Logo for news use featuring the municipality of Lake Stevens in Snohomish County, Washington. 220118
California woman dies after motorcycle crash west of Lake Stevens

Kimberly Moore was the passenger on a motorcycle Friday morning. She died the next night. She was 53.

A view of the proposed alternative station location to Everett Station located east of the current BNSF rail tracks in downtown. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Could light rail station under Pacific Avenue and over railroad work?

A group representing people around Everett Station wants Sound Transit to study the idea.

State Representative Robert Sutherland, left, gives a thumbs-up to passing drivers as he and a few volunteers wave flags and campaign signs along the side of State Route 9 on July 22, in Lake Stevens. Sam Low, right, talks with seniors on July 20 in Lake Stevens. (Sutherland photo by Ryan Berry / The Herald, Low photo by Kevin Clark / The Herald)
In GOP battle of Sutherland vs. Low, Democrats may tip the scale

The state lawmaker and Snohomish County council member are vying for a House seat. Democrats make up roughly 40% of the vote.

Chocolate peanut butter Incredibles

These chocolate peanut butter bars are, as the name suggests, incredible.

SnoTown Brewing’s Frank Sandoval in 2019. (Aaron Swaney)
SnoTown Brewery owner charged with child molestation

Frank Sandoval conceded his conduct with a girl at his brewery was inappropriate, but he denied touching her sexually, charges say.

Everett
Head-on crash in Everett leaves man with life-threatening injuries

A two-vehicle collision in the 11600 block of Evergreen Way shut down southbound traffic Monday morning.

Members of Casino Connect line up to stow luggage Tuesday morning aboard the Adventuress in Everett on August 9, 2022.  The teens will go on a four-day sailing trip where they learn about maritime skills and environmental science. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Casino Road teens on tall ship Adventuress set sail for 4-day voyage

The Everett at Sea program offers outdoor, on-the-water lessons that “underserved youth” might not get otherwise.

Jason Moon, new member of Mukilteo City Council and the first Korean American. He was appointed to fill the seat vacated by Joe Marine, who was elected mayor.
(Submitted photo)
Free food, fun at Korean American Appreciation Day in Mukilteo

City Councilmember Jason Moon organized the Aug. 13 event to connect people of all cultures.

Most Read