An aircraft seen from the gangway at the new airport at Paine Field in Everett on Jan. 9. (Kevin Clark / Herald file)

An aircraft seen from the gangway at the new airport at Paine Field in Everett on Jan. 9. (Kevin Clark / Herald file)

You’ll forget you’re at an airport Monday in Everett

Meet the new Paine Field terminal with its Italian marble countertops and glass jet bridges.

EVERETT — You’re not dreaming.

Snohomish County’s new commercial passenger airport boasts Italian marble counters and glass jet bridges.

Paine Field’s new passenger terminal, a striking steel and glass structure, welcomes travelers Monday.

Here’s what you’ll see, and how to get there. The airport, code PAE, is located at 3220 100th St. SW.

The new two-gate terminal, designed by Denver-based Fentress Architects, is on the east side of the property.

If you’re driving or on foot, turn onto 100th Street SW from Airport Road.

New electronic signs will direct you toward arrivals and departures and paid parking.

As the terminal’s swooping canopy comes into view, you may catch sight of “Red Check,” a V-shaped sculpture, and on the left, a cobalt blue swoop, “Aurora.” Both are works by artist Nova Mihai Popa.

At the arrivals and departures curb, you’ll be greeted by a sculpture of Lt. Topliff Paine, for whom the airport is named.

Now step out of the car, grab your luggage and enter the terminal’s ticketing lobby.

On the far wall is the large, easy-to-read flight display board. It flaps like an old mechanical display, a fun, retro detail.

Need help with just about anything? Staff at the concierge desk will assist.

You’ll find self-check-in kiosks throughout the lobby. They’re cute, offer instructions in Braille, and resemble R2-D2 robots.

If you’d rather check in at one of the ticket counters, you’ll find the cool Italian marble countertops.

Then follow the signs toward a short ramp that leads to the security checkpoint and departures.

Round the corner, and you’re at the Transportation Security Administration. There are three stations, including TSA Pre-check.

Brett Smith, CEO of the for-profit company Propeller Airports that built and operates the terminal, aims to whisk passengers through TSA security in minutes.

Once you’re cleared, walk into the main waiting area with its soaring 20-foot ceilings. This is where you’ll forget you’re inside an airport terminal.

Seated on a plush couch in front of a natural gas fireplace, you’ll start to imagine you’ve checked into a grand hotel.

Move over to one of the copper-colored leather chairs and gaze out the window to the Olympic Mountains. The Wi-Fi is free.

Smith says he set out to return civility and hospitality to the airline traveler, and it shows in the attention to detail.

In glass display cases throughout the main waiting area, Paine Field’s history is told with photos, mementos and model airplanes.

There are two gates and plenty of seating. Each seat offers charging ports and an outlet.

The Beecher’s Handmade Cheese restaurant isn’t serving yet, but is expected to open next month.

Beecher’s also will operate the Upper Case wine bar, which is expected to be open Monday, and a Caffe Vita coffee stand.

If you’ve landed at the terminal, you’ll walk from the plane through a glass jet bridge. Enjoy the view, whether it’s mountains, planes or rain.

It’s a stone’s throw to the baggage area.

At a small ground transportation center next to the terminal, travelers can pick up a rental car from Avis or Enterprise, grab a taxi, ride-share or hop aboard Bellair Charters and Airporter, which will run nine shuttles to the terminal daily.

For more information, go to FlyPaineField.com

Janice Podsada; jpodsada@heraldnet.com; 425-339-3097; Twitter: JanicePods

For those who want to bus it:

Everett Transit Route 8 serves the Paine Field terminal.

Community Transit’s Swift Green Line is expected to begin service on March 24. The closest stop is at 100th Street Station, a nine-minute walk to the terminal.

Community Transit’s 105 bus goes to Airport Road and 100th Street SW, a nine-minute walk to terminal.

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