An aircraft seen from the gangway at the new airport at Paine Field in Everett on Jan. 9. (Kevin Clark / Herald file)

An aircraft seen from the gangway at the new airport at Paine Field in Everett on Jan. 9. (Kevin Clark / Herald file)

You’ll forget you’re at an airport Monday in Everett

Meet the new Paine Field terminal with its Italian marble countertops and glass jet bridges.

EVERETT — You’re not dreaming.

Snohomish County’s new commercial passenger airport boasts Italian marble counters and glass jet bridges.

Paine Field’s new passenger terminal, a striking steel and glass structure, welcomes travelers Monday.

Here’s what you’ll see, and how to get there. The airport, code PAE, is located at 3220 100th St. SW.

The new two-gate terminal, designed by Denver-based Fentress Architects, is on the east side of the property.

If you’re driving or on foot, turn onto 100th Street SW from Airport Road.

New electronic signs will direct you toward arrivals and departures and paid parking.

As the terminal’s swooping canopy comes into view, you may catch sight of “Red Check,” a V-shaped sculpture, and on the left, a cobalt blue swoop, “Aurora.” Both are works by artist Nova Mihai Popa.

At the arrivals and departures curb, you’ll be greeted by a sculpture of Lt. Topliff Paine, for whom the airport is named.

Now step out of the car, grab your luggage and enter the terminal’s ticketing lobby.

On the far wall is the large, easy-to-read flight display board. It flaps like an old mechanical display, a fun, retro detail.

Need help with just about anything? Staff at the concierge desk will assist.

You’ll find self-check-in kiosks throughout the lobby. They’re cute, offer instructions in Braille, and resemble R2-D2 robots.

If you’d rather check in at one of the ticket counters, you’ll find the cool Italian marble countertops.

Then follow the signs toward a short ramp that leads to the security checkpoint and departures.

Round the corner, and you’re at the Transportation Security Administration. There are three stations, including TSA Pre-check.

Brett Smith, CEO of the for-profit company Propeller Airports that built and operates the terminal, aims to whisk passengers through TSA security in minutes.

Once you’re cleared, walk into the main waiting area with its soaring 20-foot ceilings. This is where you’ll forget you’re inside an airport terminal.

Seated on a plush couch in front of a natural gas fireplace, you’ll start to imagine you’ve checked into a grand hotel.

Move over to one of the copper-colored leather chairs and gaze out the window to the Olympic Mountains. The Wi-Fi is free.

Smith says he set out to return civility and hospitality to the airline traveler, and it shows in the attention to detail.

In glass display cases throughout the main waiting area, Paine Field’s history is told with photos, mementos and model airplanes.

There are two gates and plenty of seating. Each seat offers charging ports and an outlet.

The Beecher’s Handmade Cheese restaurant isn’t serving yet, but is expected to open next month.

Beecher’s also will operate the Upper Case wine bar, which is expected to be open Monday, and a Caffe Vita coffee stand.

If you’ve landed at the terminal, you’ll walk from the plane through a glass jet bridge. Enjoy the view, whether it’s mountains, planes or rain.

It’s a stone’s throw to the baggage area.

At a small ground transportation center next to the terminal, travelers can pick up a rental car from Avis or Enterprise, grab a taxi, ride-share or hop aboard Bellair Charters and Airporter, which will run nine shuttles to the terminal daily.

For more information, go to FlyPaineField.com

Janice Podsada; jpodsada@heraldnet.com; 425-339-3097; Twitter: JanicePods

For those who want to bus it:

Everett Transit Route 8 serves the Paine Field terminal.

Community Transit’s Swift Green Line is expected to begin service on March 24. The closest stop is at 100th Street Station, a nine-minute walk to the terminal.

Community Transit’s 105 bus goes to Airport Road and 100th Street SW, a nine-minute walk to terminal.

Talk to us

More in Local News

King County map logo
Tribal members dance to start an assemble on the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation and Orange Shirt Day Friday evening at Tulalip Gathering Hall in Tulalip, Washington on September 30, 2022.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
‘Still here’: Tulalip boarding school descendants celebrate resilience

On Orange Shirt Day, a national day of remembrance, the Tulalip Tribes honored those who suffered due to violent cultural suppression.

Councilmember Megan Dunn, left, stands next to County Executive Dave Somers as he presents his 2023 budget proposal to her, Councilmember Nate Nehring and Councilmember Sam Low. (Snohomish County)
As County Council begins budget talks, here’s how you can weigh in.

Department heads will make their pitches in the next few days. Residents will get a say at a forum and two hearings this month

Representative Rick Larsen speaks at the March For Our Lives rally on Saturday, June 11, 2022 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Larsen to hold community meeting in Everett on Monday

The veteran Democratic lawmaker will address recent legislation passed by Congress and other topics.

Everett
Everett gets state Auditor’s Office stewardship award

State Auditor Pat McCarthy presented the award during the most recent Everett City Council meeting.

Food forum
Cookie bars fit for hungry fishermen

Laurie Olsen makes these decadent bars for her fisherman husband and crew aboard the St. John II.

Dan Stucki grabs a free coffee from Espresso Chalet before heading out on his first day to assess the Bolt Creek Fire on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2022. Stucki served as a division supervisor and traveled from Utah to help contain the fire. He's been a firefighter for 21 years. (Taylor Goebel / The Herald)
Gold Bar coffee shop fuels hundreds of firefighters amid Bolt Creek blaze

The massive blaze threatened Espresso Chalet. That didn’t stop owners Mark and Sandy Klein from giving firefighters free cups of coffee.

NO CAPTION. Logo to accompany news of Washington state.
$500M-plus from opioid deal starts heading to Washington

The first settlement payments will begin reaching Washington communities in December.

Former television food personality Graham Kerr meets with residents of Windsor Square Senior Living before giving a presentation on Thursday, Sep. 15, 2022, in Marysville, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
At 88, TV chef ‘Galloping Gourmet’ still sizzles with the ladies

Graham Kerr, the granddad of cooking entertainment shows in the 1960s, calls Snohomish County home.

Most Read