The Space Needle in Seattle on Sept. 2. (Ted S. Warren / AP Photo)

The Space Needle in Seattle on Sept. 2. (Ted S. Warren / AP Photo)

King County moves toward vaccine verification system

The verification system could go into effect next month at places like clubs, theaters and stadiums.

Associated Press

SEATTLE — King County is working to set up a COVID-19 vaccine verification system that could go into effect next month at certain non-essential, high-risk settings.

The Seattle Times reports this would make it easier for places like clubs, theaters and stadiums to check the vaccination status of their patrons.

King County’s announcement Tuesday comes as nearly all major spectator sports in the Seattle area said they would require vaccination (or a recent negative COVID test) for admission to their games.

The county said it is gathering feedback from community organizations, labor unions, businesses and cities.

“COVID-19 vaccines are safe, highly effective, and readily available, and verifying vaccination in certain non-essential, high-risk settings can make those places safer for the public, workers, and our community, including children who are not currently eligible for vaccination,” said Dr. Jeff Duchin, King County’s Health Officer.

Vaccines are free and health insurance is not required.

Other jurisdictions, including New York, San Francisco and British Columbia, have begun to implement vaccine verification systems.

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