Addressing global poverty addresses many problems

In life, many people hear the phrase, “Be the change that you want to see in the world.” In just eleven words, one begins to think more about their life and what else they have to offer. What is left to be changed depends entirely upon the person.

Some may find that we need a more secure nation. Others may believe that during a distressing time such as ours, economic stability needs improvement. However, these are no easy circumstances to change. So, what is the next step?

To be able to take the next step, one must start by taking the first step; narrowing the field and uncovering the root of the cause. Global poverty is the root of the cause for most scenarios that are in need of change. Impoverished countries are prone to terrorism, disease, economic underdevelopment, and overall instability.

Taking the next step to address global poverty is advocacy. To be more specific, advocating for the protection of the International Affairs Budget, which allocates money towards combating global poverty through agricultural and medicinal programs. The Borgen Project is a national campaign that does so by educating and mobilizing people to become advocates for fighting poverty. One can join this mission by simply emailing or calling their congressional leaders as a form of advocacy.

As one can see, being the change is possible. In taking the next step, I encourage you to become an advocate against poverty in order to “be the change that you want to see in the world.”

Audrey Kummer

Everett

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