Terry and Kim Kovel

‘Pope Joan’ game was popular pastime in 18th century homes

Game boards can be sought-after antiques — just keep them out of the sun.

‘Foot Art’ table may just be the strangest you’ve ever seen

It has a flat top, one drawer with a human nose for a handle, and a resin foot for the base.

Water-carriers were popular subjects for pre-photo figurines

The 10- to 15-inch-tall statues were made or porcelain or bronze, and most were glazed in colors.

Brazier found in Pompeii inspired copies in the 18th century

The excavated piece buried in 78 A.D. was a heater used to warm up a Roman bath in the city.

This creepy-looking doll helped 1890s kids learn

And if you have one in the attic, you’ll want to sell it. It’s worth up to $64K.

This iron frog sits on a ball on a curvy base while balancing a sprinkler on his nose, waiting to water the lawn. The rare figure, even though repainted, auctioned for $780 at a Bertoia auction in June of last year.

Iron figural garden sprinklers can be worth thousands

The vintage garden pieces were made in all shapes, sizes and materials.

This iron frog sits on a ball on a curvy base while balancing a sprinkler on his nose, waiting to water the lawn. The rare figure, even though repainted, auctioned for $780 at a Bertoia auction in June of last year.
This Campeche chair is tooled leather and oak. It was made in the late 19th century and is 33 by 21 inches. It sold for $976.

Mexican Campeche chairs were popular with 2 Founding Fathers

Also called “plantation chairs,” they were common in Southern homes.

This Campeche chair is tooled leather and oak. It was made in the late 19th century and is 33 by 21 inches. It sold for $976.

Huckleberry Finn doorstop based on Mark Twain’s character

Cast-iron figural door stops didn’t became popular until the 1910s, when the U.S. began making them.

Folding fans weren’t just for fashion — they were status symbols

In the 1700s, a talented fan painter was as important as a landscape or portrait artist.

Old paperweight looks like a forgotten mound of gold coins

An inscribed leather patch on the bottom has a message: “Your friendship is more precious than gold.”

Antique watering can made in Aesthetic style in 19th century

The first watering pot was made about 1580. It was another 50-100 years before someone added a spout.

This Wallace Nutting tavern table sold for $469 at auction

Antique dealers say early 1900s oak furniture doesn’t sell, but even copies can be a good investment.

Vintage tazza is from the late 19th- to early 20th-century

It’s a wide but shallow saucer-like dish, decorated with flowers, and mounted on a stem and foot.

Glass prism likely lit up lower decks of vintage sailing ships

Just an ornament today, it has a slightly green tint, is 4½ inches high and very heavy.

Wear and tear of this antique fountain adds to its romance

The Rookwood piece sold at auction a few years ago brought $2,300, even though it was damaged.

Stumpwork was a 3-D artform of the preindustrial age

This difficult type of embroidery was popular in England from about 1650 to 1700.

Antique sofa is completely covered with shells — not fabric

The furniture sold for $4,613, nearly twice its estimated worth, to a buyer who likes the ocean.

Surfer toy has wheels that let it roll on an eccentric path

The girl’s one-piece yellow bathing suit suggests it was made a date in the late 1950s or ’60s.

Vintage globes can be dated by countries’ upheaval and change

The oldest surviving globe showing our planet was made in 1492 by Martin Behaim of Germany.

What’s a phonolamp? Thomas Edison’s lamp with phonograph as base

The combination phonograph-lamp, designed in about 1920, was made to be kept in the living room.