Seattle artist Harold Hollingsworth is painting Dazzle Ship patterns on walls at the Schack Art Center for its upcoming exhibition, “The Intersection of Art + Math.” (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Seattle artist Harold Hollingsworth is painting Dazzle Ship patterns on walls at the Schack Art Center for its upcoming exhibition, “The Intersection of Art + Math.” (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Learn how artists use math at Schack show

The show in Everett will include the works of 59 artists and feature a dance performance May 4.

The theme of the upcoming Schack Art Center show, “The Intersection of Art + Math,” may have people shaking their heads in curiosity.

They may wonder what possible connection there could be between two such seemingly disparate things.

“I think most people don’t inherently associate art and math,” said Maren Oates, spokeswoman for the art center.

The point of the exhibit is to show all the ways artists use math in the creation of their work, she said, from measuring things to understanding the plane or perspective of the piece.

The show, which includes the works of 59 artists, opens April 26. It is the result of an unusual collaboration between Schack and Seattle’s Center on Contemporary Art, which recently had a show with a similar theme — “Art Intersect Math.”

Schack, which had previously decided to have its math-themed exhibition, asked if works from the Seattle show could be incorporated into its show.

The Schack show includes 38 works curated by the art center, with 21 coming from the CoCA show.

That’s not the only collaboration between the two arts organizations.

A contemporary dance, “necessary and sufficient,” was originally performed at CoCA as part of its “Art Intersect Math” show. It will be performed in a special one-night performance at the Schack on May 4.

The dance adapts math principles in its movements. It was created by Katherine Cook, who co-curated CoCA’s art show. Cook also is creative director for a Seattle business, Math for Love.

“The opportunity to make public this inner private relationship between dance and mathematics was very appealing to me,” she said.

Equivalence — deciding when two things are the same — is one of the math concepts included in the work.

Likewise, the name of the performance — “necessary and sufficient — ” is a style of mathematical proofs to establish equivalents between two apparently different things, she said.

The improvised performance is intended to match the spirit of the art show. There’s a similarity in the way dancers problem solve their way through the performance and how a mathematician works through a problem, Cook said.

Another highlight of the “Intersection of Art + Math” show is a mural created by Seattle artist Harold Hollingsworth in a hallway in the Schack’s mezzanine.

It can only be seen during the exhibit. Then it will be painted over as the art center readies for its next show.

It’s the first time the art center has decided to have an artist produce a painting just for one show, Oates said.

The show includes a rotating blue-and-yellow wall sculpture by Paul Vexler. If his name sounds familiar, his “Conic Sections” sculpture (also math-based) was installed on Washington State University’s Everett campus earlier this year.

“I think anyone coming to this show will be blown away by the artwork, but also just the amount of thought and planning and mathematical ideas that have gone into all the pieces,” Oates said.

Sharon Salyer: 425-339-3486 or salyer@heraldnet.com.

If you go

The Intersection of Art + Math runs April 26-June 2 at the Schack Art Center, 2921 Hoyt Ave., Everett. The opening reception is 5 to 8 p.m. April 26.

A special dance performance, “necessary and sufficient: a dance of mathematics” is scheduled from 7 to 8:30 p.m. May 4 at the Schack. The improvisational performance is part of the art center’s exhibit, “The Intersection of Art + Math.”

Doors open at 7 p.m. with an opportunity to view the exhibit, followed by the dance performance. Those interested in attending are asked to register at bit.ly/2HMI1sd. The suggestion donation, which can be made at the door, is $10.

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