Frozen water and snow sit on top of a damaged storage basin roof at Everett’s water filtration plant near Monroe. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Frozen water and snow sit on top of a damaged storage basin roof at Everett’s water filtration plant near Monroe. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

A water plant got a new roof. It collapsed months later.

The damage to the Everett-owned facility came after a series of winter storms dropped record snowfall.

MONROE — The city of Everett is still investigating what caused a less-than-year-old roof to collapse at a water filtration plant it operates. The damage came after a series of winter storms brought record snowfall.

The site provides drinking water for approximately 75 percent of businesses and residents in Snohomish County. In 2017, the Everett water system supplied over 19 billion gallons.

Testing has shown the water remains safe to drink. The filtration plant sits at the southern end of Lake Chaplain, northeast of Monroe.

“We don’t know what happened. We’re still in the investigatory stage,” said Kathleen Baxter, a spokesperson for the Everett’s public works department. “Nothing has been ruled out yet.”

The damage was discovered early Feb. 12 during a routine check, according to Baxter. The next day, city staff and the contractor who built the roof came to examine the structure.

The water filtration plant delivers an average of 50 million gallons of drinking water per day and can treat up to 141 million gallons each day, according to the city.

After treatment, water is sent to one of two large storage basins known as clear wells.

“The clear wells (provide) a buffer between demand and production,” Baxter said.

It was the roof of the east clear well that sustained damage. The structure, which can hold 5.2 million gallons, was built in 1983. In August, the 35-year-old roof was replaced by contractor T Bailey, Inc. The Anacortes firm designed and built the project for $3.1 million. A warranty was included in the contract. T Bailey didn’t respond to calls for comment.

After the collapse was discovered, the east clear well was removed from service. In that process, the two clear wells were disconnected from each other.

There was no damage to the west clear well. It can hold 6.75 million gallons.

Although about half of the water filtration plant’s storage capacity was taken offline, the city said it still has enough to serve its customers.

“Everett’s water system has redundancies built in to prepare for situations like this,” Baxter said.

Lizz Giordano: 425-374-4165; egiordano@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @lizzgior.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Staff are evaluating two more light rail alternatives for the Everett Link extension. One would follow Interstate 5 north of 128th Street SW to the Everett Mall and back to the freeway. Another would go west of 128th Street SW to Highway 99 and north to Casino Road. (Sound Transit)
Snohomish County leaders reject light rail routes bypassing Paine Field

Those options weren’t what voters approved — and would be like “butchering” the plan, the Snohomish County executive said.

A Sound Transit train arrives at Westlake Station in downtown Seattle. (Sue Misao / Herald file) May 2019
Should light rail skip Paine Field and Boeing? We asked, you answered

More than 300 Herald readers responded to an online poll. Here are the results.

Councilmember Megan Dunn, left, stands next to County Executive Dave Somers as he presents his 2023 budget proposal to her, Councilmember Nate Nehring and Councilmember Sam Low. (Snohomish County)
As County Council begins budget talks, here’s how you can weigh in.

Department heads will make their pitches in the next few days. Residents will get a say at a forum and two hearings this month

Logo for news use featuring the municipality of Lake Stevens in Snohomish County, Washington. 220118
Highway 9 work could disrupt travel through Lake Stevens

Construction is set for roundabouts on South Lake Stevens Road and one at North Davies Road and Vernon Road.

Lynnwood City Council members, from left: Jim Smith, Shirley Sutton, Shannon Sessions, Josh Binda, George Hurst, Julieta Altamirano-Crosby, and Patrick Decker. (City of Lynnwood)
No penalty for Lynnwood council member’s ‘underinformed’ views on racism

The City Council didn’t censure Jim Smith after a report found he discriminated against a Black city employee.

All ears: Mukilteo couple provides surgery for kids born without ears

Dr. Prabhat and Trish Bhama are part of a HUGS volunteer team providing treatment for microtia in Guatemala.

Everett
Everett gets state Auditor’s Office stewardship award

State Auditor Pat McCarthy presented the award during the most recent Everett City Council meeting.

Representative Rick Larsen speaks at the March For Our Lives rally on Saturday, June 11, 2022 in Everett, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Larsen to hold community meeting in Everett on Monday

The veteran Democratic lawmaker will address recent legislation passed by Congress and other topics.

Tribal members dance to start an assemble on the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation and Orange Shirt Day Friday evening at Tulalip Gathering Hall in Tulalip, Washington on September 30, 2022.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
‘Still here’: Tulalip boarding school descendants celebrate resilience

On Orange Shirt Day, a national day of remembrance, the Tulalip Tribes honored those who suffered due to violent cultural suppression.

Most Read