Crews laid down the first A-frame support structure after removing it from the previous loading terminal for the Daisy chair using a crane. (Vail Resorts)

Crews laid down the first A-frame support structure after removing it from the previous loading terminal for the Daisy chair using a crane. (Vail Resorts)

At Stevens Pass, summer work promises uplifting ski season

Two new chairlifts are part of a $35 million investment into four mountains including Stevens.

STEVENS PASS — Upgrades to two Stevens Pass chairlifts aim to speed up the path to the slopes for beginning skiers and snowboarders.

Chairlifts and loading terminals on the Daisy and Brooks trails are receiving complete overhauls this summer as part of an investment by owner Vail Resorts.

“We listened to what the team had to say about what we could do from an improvement standpoint,” said Tom Pettigrew, general manager of Stevens Pass Ski Resort. “This seemed to be where we could focus our investment to have the greatest on-mountain experience change in a positive direction.”

New four-person chairs on the Daisy lift to the beginner terrain are projected to carry 33 percent more riders, and an updated loading area is designed to foster an easier loading process for novices.

A regrade of the Brooks terminal will give skiers a downhill approach to an improved chairlift which will now seat four people, doubling the capacity of the two-person chairs.

“The chairlift improvements will help our guests spend less time in line and more time on the hill and really enjoy the experience,” Pettigrew said.

As part of the revamp, regulars at the Skyline Express chairlift will find it 140 feet farther up the mountain next winter. In a single day, crews will use the simultaneous work of two cranes to deliver the terminal to its new location.

The shift will create space for better access to the Skyline, Brooks and Hogsback Express lifts.

Seattle resident Brian Ulman has skied Stevens Pass since 1983 and, despite not riding the Daisy or Brooks lifts, he believes the changes will benefit everyone.

“It’s going to reduce the lines at the chairs I want to ski,” he said.

The full height of crane is shown as it removes the second A-frame support beam from the old Daisy chairlift loading terminal. (Vail Resorts)

The full height of crane is shown as it removes the second A-frame support beam from the old Daisy chairlift loading terminal. (Vail Resorts)

Miles McKee, a 20-year skier of Stevens Pass, will be teaching his 4-year-old son to ski this winter. He is excited to see how the remodel to Daisy makes the skiing experience easier for his son and others.

“Any improvement or any ease of access to boarding the chairlift for the first time is definitely a welcome improvement,” McKee said.

All upgrades are part of a two-year, four-mountain, $35 million capital investment announced last year by Vail Resorts, which bought Stevens Pass for $67 million in 2018.

Work began on the lifts at the end of April and is expected to be completed by the start of the 2019-2020 operating season on Dec. 4.

Dining options at the resort will also be undergoing changes, however the specifics of those investments are still undecided. Other facility improvements are also expected over time.

“We will have a winter to see how these replacements affect how the customers utilize the hill,” Pettigrew said. There are “still some older chairlifts and infrastructure that we will be evaluating in the future, so stay tuned.”

Ian Davis-Leonard: 425-339-3449; idavisleonard@heraldnet.com. Twitter: IanDavisLeonard.

Talk to us

More in Local News

A resident reported finding a dead Asian giant hornet near Marysville on June 4. (U.S. Department of Agriculture)
Dead ‘murder hornet’ found in Marysville, a first for county

It could be from a previous season, scientists say, because males don’t typically emerge this early.

Jeff Thoreson does a cheer with his second grade class before the start of their kickball game on his last in-person day of school on Thursday, June 17, 2021 in Snohomish, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Snohomish teacher hit the right notes in memorable career

Jeff Thoreson will retire this month after molding minds at Riverview Elementary School for 41 years.

FILE - In this Dec. 16, 2020, file photo, Staff Sgt. Travis Snyder, left, receives the first dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine given at Madigan Army Medical Center at Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington state, south of Seattle. Nurse Jose Picart, right, administered the shot. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee on Thursday, June 17, 2021, announced a new COVID-19 vaccine incentive lottery for the state's military, family members and veterans because the federal government wasn't sharing individual vaccine status of those groups with the state and there were concerns they would be left out of a previously announced lottery. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
New vaccine lottery announced for military in Washington

Gov. Inslee said there were concerns they would be left out of a previously announced lottery.

Police: After short chase in Marysville, man dies by suicide

Officers responded to a domestic violence call. The suspect reportedly shot himself at the end of a chase.

The Everett Police Department has asked the City Council to keep its nine Stay Out of Drug Areas, zones where people arrested for drug crimes are not allowed. (City of Everett)
Everett police ask council to renew 9 drug enforcement areas

SODAs are a legal tool that prohibits people arrested for drug crimes from entering certain areas.

Sequoia High graduates move their tassels from one side to the other at the end of the graduation ceremony on Thursday, June 17, 2021 in Everett, Washington. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Gallery: Sequoia High Graduation

Sequoia High School graduates receive their diplomas

Woman killed in hit-and-run south of Everett is identified

Detectives have been searching for the vehicle that struck Katherine Mueller, 31, of Snohomish.

Pallet communities are groups of tiny homes for unhoused people. Here, a worker installs weatherstripping on a pallet shelter at Pallet in Everett in January 2020. (Kevin Clark / Herald file)
Tiny home community is proposed at a Marysville church

The Pallet shelter community would provide transitional housing to eight people. Neighbors have questions.

In Edmonds, ‘small cell’ deployment permit becomes a big deal

The City Council has allowed new cellular equipment under an ordinance that regulates conditions.

Most Read