An aerial view of the proposed site for the Faith Family Village Project pallet homes for families on March 8 in Everett. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

An aerial view of the proposed site for the Faith Family Village Project pallet homes for families on March 8 in Everett. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)

Everett eyeing Sievers Duecy city land for new shelter village

If approved, it could be near another new village for families at a church — and the third shelter of its kind in the city.

EVERETT — People needing temporary housing could have more options next year with two proposed Pallet Shelter villages less than 1 mile apart in Everett’s Evergreen and Madison neighborhoods.

City staff are considering a community, similar to one managed by the Everett Gospel Mission, at Glenwood Avenue and Sievers Duecy Boulevard. It would host women and children on part of 8.2 acres of undeveloped land owned by the city near the Phil Johnson Ballfields.

The shelter could have 20 tiny houses made by Everett-based Pallet Shelter near the intersection by early next year. There also would be restroom units and a community space.

The city already bought the shelters with funding from the American Rescue Plan Act.

Volunteers of America would manage the Glenwood site, working with the children and women who live there under contract with the city.

“Between all ZIP codes and counties, 98201 is the number one ZIP code leading the request for shelter and housing in the state of Washington,” Volunteers of America of Western Washington housing services senior director Galina Volchkova told the council Wednesday night. “So there’s need specifically here in Everett. We need to serve moms with children.”

Each unit would be 100 square feet. Volunteers of America would provide security, on-site case management for residents, life skills classes, transportation to Early Childhood Education and Assistance Program, a food pantry and other services.

Volunteers of America of Western Washington plans on community engagement on the proposal this summer. The city could receive the land use application this fall, site development through winter and occupancy early next year.

Under a mile east, another proposed temporary shelter community is moving through the city’s land use and permit process.

Called Faith Family Village, it would be next to Faith Lutheran Church at 6708 Cady Road, just off of Madison Street. The Faith Food Bank, which operates from a building on the property, would manage it for families. They would stay up to 90 days with the goal of moving into more permanent housing in that time.

Roxana Boroujerdi, right, discusses the proposed Faith Family Village temporary shelter for families Wednesday. If approved, it would have eight units for people to stay up to 90 days and has support from Everett Mayor Cassie Franklin, left, Evangelical Lutheran Church of America World Hunger’s Juliana Glassco, and U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Roxana Boroujerdi, right, discusses the proposed Faith Family Village temporary shelter for families Wednesday. If approved, it would have eight units for people to stay up to 90 days and has support from Everett Mayor Cassie Franklin, left, Evangelical Lutheran Church of America World Hunger’s Juliana Glassco, and U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Outside sources are helping pay for the startup costs.

Rep. Rick Larsen secured $254,560 in federal money that will pay for eight 100-square-foot units and preparing the property.

The national Evangelical Lutheran Church of America World Hunger program gave Faith Family Village a $75,000 grant. Normally the national church leadership invites 12 ministries to apply for the grant and four get money. All 12 applications were funded because of donors this year, spokesperson Lindsey Queener said.

The World Hunger program focuses on solutions to hunger and poverty. Securing a home is one way to address those problems, said Juliana Glassco, a director with ELCA World Hunger.

A 2021 Snohomish County report found over 33% of households spent more than 30% of their income on housing costs. It makes it challenging to save to buy a home or for a rainy day fund.

“We know housing and access to affordable housing is a huge issue” and “increasingly urgent,” Glassco said.

Officials from Faith Lutheran Church and the food bank said that money will help convert a vacant former preschool building on the property into a space with bathrooms, dining and kitchen space, and washer and dryer machines.

Evangelical Lutheran Church of America World Hunger leaders hope Faith Family Village inspires other ministries.

“If our little church can do it, then they can do it,” food bank and shelter director Roxana Boroujerdi said.

She and other Faith Lutheran Church leaders hope to have permits later this summer and move in residents by October.

When they arrive, they’ll have fully furnished units. People have donated bedding, linens, socks and toiletries that are stored in the church. Some of the congregation’s members are making quilt blankets for the residents, who can keep them when they move out.

Ben Watanabe: 425-339-3037; bwatanabe@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @benwatanabe.

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