Eduardo Carrillo, of Gov. Jay Inslee’s office, uses a bullhorn to announce upcoming bill signings outside Inslee’s office Tuesday at the Capitol in Olympia. Inslee signed the state’s capital, operating, and transportation budgets, officially designating funds — and new taxes — to pay for state programs for the next two years. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Eduardo Carrillo, of Gov. Jay Inslee’s office, uses a bullhorn to announce upcoming bill signings outside Inslee’s office Tuesday at the Capitol in Olympia. Inslee signed the state’s capital, operating, and transportation budgets, officially designating funds — and new taxes — to pay for state programs for the next two years. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Inslee signs new $52.4 billion spending plan for the state

To help pay for this budget, taxes are getting raised on businesses, big banks and vaping products.

  • By Wire Service
  • Wednesday, May 22, 2019 7:50am
  • Local News

Associated Press

OLYMPIA — Gov. Jay Inslee Tuesday signed the state’s capital, operating, and transportation budgets, officially designating funds — and tax increases — to pay for state programs for the next two years.

Along with existing programs, the budgets fund expanded college grants for low and middle-income students, an expansion of the state’s mental health system, and the first phase of hybridizing the state’s ferry system.

“This is a budget that puts people first,” Inslee said as he signed the state’s $52.4 billion operating budget.

But Inslee also called out a looming funding challenge for the state: Fixing culverts — large pipes that allow streams to flow under roadways, but can prevent salmon from reaching their spawning grounds. As a result of a U.S. Supreme Court ruling, the state has to fix hundreds of culverts around the state, at a cost some estimates have put as high as $3.5 billion. Many of the culverts must be fixed by 2030.

Inslee and legislators in his own party went back-and-forth over how much to put toward the fixes during the Legislature’s regular 105-day session. In a rebuke to legislators, Inslee used what he called budget flexibility to force an increase in the amount of money going to the projects, and warned that legislators would have to add even more money in coming years.

“This is just a down payment on the multibillion dollar tab legislators left unpaid,” Inslee said. “This does not solve the problem.”

Gov. Jay Inslee signs the 2019–21 operating budget on May 21. (Office of the Governor photo)

Gov. Jay Inslee signs the 2019–21 operating budget on May 21. (Office of the Governor photo)

Inslee increased the funding to $275 million over the next two years, more than twice the $100 million lawmakers put in the transportation budget they delivered to the governor.

Republicans objected to the level of spending and the new and higher taxes. They argued economic growth statewide, in parallel with the thriving U.S. economy, had generated enough of an increase in tax revenues to sustain government spending without new taxes.

The budget, said Sen. John Braun, R-Centralia, “isn’t good news for the families and employers, who will pay the price one way or another.”

That echoed remarks from Republicans lawmakers throughout the legislative session, as Democratic lawmakers used their control over both halves of the Legislature to shape the state’s budgets around their own priorities.

Two tax bills targeting wealthy corporations and individuals were included in the package of bills signed by Inslee Tuesday.

One would target professional service companies like accounting, architecture and engineering firms, along with large computing companies, potentially including Google and Amazon, with a tiered up-charge on the state’s Business and Occupation tax. Businesses making over $100 billion in gross revenues would be in the top tier, and would see a two-thirds increase on their tax rate over current levels.

The revenue from the tax would expand college grants for low and middle-income college students, including providing full-tuition scholarships to all qualifying students from families of four making $50,000 per year or less.

Another tax bill would convert the state’s current flat real estate excise tax to a tiered system, increasing the taxes collected on sales of properties over $1.5 million, decreasing the collection on properties under $500,000, and keeping the rate for homes in the middle unchanged.

A major component of the budget was the overhaul and expansion of the state’s mental and behavioral health system, a point of bipartisan consensus during the legislative session.

“The expansion that’s the most meaningful in this budget is the commitment to reforming the state’s woefully inadequate behavioral health system, from community-level services all the way up to the state’s mental health institutions,” said Democratic Sen. Christine Rolfes, the chief budget writer in the Senate,

The operating budget includes about $47 million to expand behavioral health facilities in communities around the state, as well as over $150 million to improve state hospitals and comply with the federal court ruling in the Trueblood case, which required the state to shorten wait times for people found incompetent to stand trial.

Long a priority for Inslee, some of that money would help add treatment capacity in communities around the state, in the form of intensive residential facilities, medium-term treatment facilities, and peer support centers, to serve patients who don’t qualify for civil commitment but still need care.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Everett
Man shot at Everett apartment

The man in his 30s was shot Sunday night. No arrests had been made.

Logo for news use featuring the municipality of Lake Stevens in Snohomish County, Washington. 220118
Motorcyclist identified in fatal crash near Lake Stevens

Anthony Palko, 33, died Monday night after colliding with a passenger car. The juveniles in the car were taken to the hospital.

Marysville
Police: Marysville man shot sword-wielding roommate in self-defense

The roommates were arguing over eBay sales, according to police. Then one of them allegedly brandished a two-foot sword.

Logo for news use featuring the municipality of Lake Stevens in Snohomish County, Washington. 220118
Everett boy, 12, identified as Davies Beach drowning victim

Malachi Bell was one of three swimmers in distress Sunday in Lake Stevens. He did not survive.

Everett
Port of Everett hosting annual open house after pandemic hiatus

Also, Rustic Cork Wine Bar plans to open a second shop at Fisherman’s Harbor — the latest addition to the port’s “wine walk.”

The “Village of Hope,” a tiny home community including 17 shelters, is set to open on Mission Hill Road in Tulalip in September. (Tulalip Tribes)
Tulalip Tribes to open tiny home village with 17 shelters

It’s called the Village of Hope. Monthly culture nights will feature classes in Lushootseed and “Tulalip cooking.”

Everett Code Enforcement issued a violation citation to the owner of the Grand Apartments building at 2331 Rockefeller Ave., after allegedly finding exposed electrical wiring and evidence of unpermitted electrical and plumbing work. (City of Everett)
Grand Apartments, which saw outcry from tenants, faces code violations

The Everett complex has had its share of issues. Now the city is threatening fines if something isn’t done.

"Shoes are like jeans," says Dominic Ahn, 53, who took over ownership from his parents, who started the store 40 years ago. Photographed in Edmonds, Washington on June 30, 2022. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
EEEEEE! Edmonds shoe shop sells wide shoes only

The store has over 600 styles of work and play shoes for men and women with feet from D to 8E widths.

Tomato is charred by Joel Childs Thursday afternoon at The Chef Behind The Curtain in Snohomish, Washington on June 30, 2022. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
This tiny Snohomish restaurant is a best-kept secret among locals

You don’t have to travel to Seattle — or drain your savings — for a fine dining experience.

Most Read