Marysville Pilchuck senior Cheyenne Coe is a driven student whose heart is sold on becoming a medical professional. Coe, 18, cites the October 2014 shootings at the high school as one part of her emotional drive to become an emergency room nurse. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Marysville Pilchuck senior Cheyenne Coe is a driven student whose heart is sold on becoming a medical professional. Coe, 18, cites the October 2014 shootings at the high school as one part of her emotional drive to become an emergency room nurse. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Her school’s tragedy set her on a course to become a nurse

Marysville Pilchuck senior Cheyenne Coe decided she wants to be an emergency room nurse.

MARYSVILLE — A public tragedy was personal for Marysville Pilchuck High School senior Cheyenne Coe, 18, who cites the October 2014 shootings as one part of her emotional drive to become an emergency room nurse.

Question: You’re taking college-level Advanced Placement biology and human anatomy. Do you have a specific career goal in mind?

Answer: I actually want to be an ER nurse. The ER has been my plan since freshman year.

Q: That was the year of the shootings at MP.

A: It’s hit close to home for me. I definitely still think of it. I knew all of them. That was more than just an incident at school for my family and I. I feel like that helped me finally decide. … Going to the hospital, and waiting to hear the news. That’s where it hit me. I decided I was going to be someone’s last effort.

Q: You’re applying to the University of Washington Bothell, and hope to go from there to Everett Community College’s nursing school. After that?

A: After working for a few years I plan to go back and get my master’s and maybe be a nurse practitioner as well as in the ER.

Q: What’s it like being a senior?

A: Right now it’s kind of a waiting game. I know what I want to do, my plan — set forth years ahead. So now it’s just waiting to hear back and finish out high school. I’m ready to go on and get into nursing.

Q: Do you have any hobbies?

A: I paintball. I’ve paintballed about 10 years now, traveled northern Washington to Oregon for three-day paintball games sometimes. (It’s fun) especially being a girl, and they think I’m not going to be any good — and then they come back and apologize.

Q: Ouch?

A: It only stings for a second. It’s just a lot of fun. There’s a lot of thinking that goes into playing. And also being outside — I love being outside. It’s kind of my thing. … My first concussion came from paintball.

Q: You said “first concussion.” (Others came in cross country, volleyball, and a Young Life skit where a stunt went awry.) You’re also a cheerleader. Any concussions there?

A: Not yet. … My coach said she’s never had an injury medical file as big as mine.

Q: What else do you do to relax?

A: I’m probably one of the few high school students who likes to be home and spend time with family. We’ll relax together and watch some of our favorite shows.

Q: What’s one of your favorite shows?

A: “60 Days In.” It’s about normal people who go undercover to spend 60 days in jail to tell the sheriff what’s there.

Q: Who inspires you?

A: Two people come to mind. My best friend, Bryttanie, who goes to Snohomish. She has always helped me when I’m struggling. … The second person is my old teacher, Mr. Riechel, who I had for chemistry and AP chemistry. He was more than a teacher. When I had a tough day, he would notice right away. … I still visit and see him (at Glacier Peak High School) sometimes.

Q: What advice would you give someone entering high school?

A: Know that you’re going to struggle. Always push forward, no matter what’s going on.

Melissa Slager: mslager@heraldnet.com; 425-339-3432.

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