Bill would allow use ranked-choice voting for local elections

There is a simple way to improve our local elections so that our officials are chosen in a more direct, democratic way than they are now. This improvement is called ranked-choice voting. RCV allows each voter to rank several candidates in order of their preference, and the results will more accurately reflect the will of the voters. It allows us to vote for the candidate we actually prefer without “wasting” our vote, instead of having to vote for the “least bad” candidate who is more likely to win.

If our preferred candidate doesn’t win, our second, (and third etc.), choice votes still count. This simple, common-sense adjustment to the election process is growing in popularity in large and small communities across the country, as well as at the state level in Maine and Alaska. Ranking multiple candidates is always optional; you can still just vote for one if you choose.

Current Washington law prohibits local election boards from making this improvement to their elections, but House Bill 1156: Increasing Representation and Voter Participation In Local Elections, currently in committee in the state Legislature, would give local jurisdictions the freedom to make this change if their constituents approve it.

Please support the freedom of Washington communities to make this improvement to their elections by going to the Fair Vote Washington website: fairvotewa.org.

You can learn all about ranked-choice voting and, with a few clicks, help to get HB 1156 passed.

Don Wehrman

Everett

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