Arlington students Shawn McKinley and Brock Schamp build a bench during their Regional Apprenticeship Pathways class. (The Arlington Times)

Arlington students Shawn McKinley and Brock Schamp build a bench during their Regional Apprenticeship Pathways class. (The Arlington Times)

A new pathway to construction, electrical and labor trades

Students who complete the program will receive college credit through Everett Community College.

The Arlington Times

ARLINGTON — The Regional Apprenticeship Pathways program kicked off this year and students are learning skills that can help them graduate and focus on their careers.

The RAP Center is located on the Marysville Pilchuck High School campus. The program is a partnership between Marysville School District, Arlington Public Schools, Everett Community College and other regional and state partners.

The program, developed to close the gap in skilled trade employees, was funded through a $1.5 million startup grant from Career Connect Washington.

“There’s a huge need for skilled employees in our region and there’s about a 10-year gap in apprenticeships,” said Brian Long, Arlington Public Schools’ director of college and career readiness. “The average age of an apprentice is 27 or 28. This program is trying to provide the students with the necessary skills so they can become apprentices with local unions at an earlier age.”

Juniors and seniors in north Snohomish County schools can apply for the RAP program. Students learn skills to prepare them for apprenticeships in construction, electrical and labor trades. There are plans to include more trade unions next year.

Twelve of the 25 students in the program are from Arlington.

Arlington High School senior Lesslie Garcia-Castro is the only female enrolled in the RAP program.

She found she enjoyed the hands-on learning experience while taking a construction geometry class at AHS during her sophomore year. She attends the RAP program from 8 a.m to 10:45 a.m. during the day, while the rest of her day is spent on campus in other classes. Her goal is to become an architect.

“We’ve already built shelves, toolboxes and step stools,” Garcia-Castro said. “The program allows you to work individually and in groups. I’m happy that once I’ve completed the program, I’ll be able to show a future employer that I have the necessary experience and skills they’re looking for.”

Students who complete the program will receive a certificate as well as college credit through Everett Community College. It will help prepare them for careers in construction, electrical, and other pathways, Long said,

“We’re trying to fulfill the needs of the workforce,” Long said. “For instance, Sound Transit projects that are heading north don’t have enough skilled employees to complete their projects. We’re preparing our students who want to go into these fields with the skills necessary to meet that demand.”

This story originally appeared in The Arlington Times, a sibling paper to the Herald.

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