A man walks past the carport roof, which is covered with solar panels, at HopeWorks Station in Everett. The project has been awarded a Platinum LEED certificate for environmentally friendly design and features. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

A man walks past the carport roof, which is covered with solar panels, at HopeWorks Station in Everett. The project has been awarded a Platinum LEED certificate for environmentally friendly design and features. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Affordable housing project takes top honors for green design

HopeWorks Station in Everett earned the highest LEED rating for energy-saving and eco-friendly features.

EVERETT — HopeWorks Station gave 102 people a home when it opened in October. The center at 3315 Broadway Ave. provides housing, job training and social services for people who are homeless or live in poverty.

Now there’s another reason to celebrate.

HopeWorks recently learned that its new building took top honors for green design and energy efficiency.

The development received a Platinum Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certificate from the U.S. Green Building Council, a non-profit group.

Only 10% of buildings that apply for certification receive a LEED platinum rating, according to the council.

The group’s ranking system consists of four levels — certified, silver, gold and platinum.

“We think this is may be the first building in Everett to be awarded a platinum level certificate,” said Cynthia Eichner, director of community engagement at HopeWorks, a Housing Hope affiliate.

Housing Hope and HopeWorks Social Enterprises developed the $30 million project, which was funded by 13 sources, including grants from the city of Everett, Snohomish County, the state of Washington, tax credits and loans from social investors.

Dykeman Architects, an Everett firm, designed the building.

HopeWorks Station on Broadway in Everett. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

HopeWorks Station on Broadway in Everett. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

What’s so green about HopeWorks Station?

It’s a long list that includes solar panels, electric-vehicle charging stations, triple-pane energy-efficient windows, a bike repair station, multiple bike racks and apple trees.

Start with the carport between the new HopeWorks Station and the center’s Renew Home & Decor consignment store. Solar panels are installed on top of the carport’s roof. Not only does it keep the rain off the parking lot, it generates power.

Fred Safstrom, CEO of Housing Hope and HopeWorks, said the two groups have been incorporating sustainability throughout their projects over the years, in addition to developing affordable housing and workforce development programs in Snohomish County.

“This project is not the first, nor the last, and is a huge and impactful step in the right direction,” Safstrom said in an email.

A monitor in the lobby at HopeWorks Station in Everett shows daily energy usage, cost and savings. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

A monitor in the lobby at HopeWorks Station in Everett shows daily energy usage, cost and savings. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

“We are so excited to be the first to receive this award in the city of Everett and so grateful to all of our partners involved in achieving this LEED Platinum Certification,” Safstrom said. “We are proud to set good example of maintaining a balance between economic growth, social equity, and environment quality what some define as sustainability. From our perspective, the achievement of this award supports our mission, workforce development programs and environmental sustainability.”

At Kindred Kitchen, the building’s first-floor restaurant, bowls, plates and to-go bags are made of eco-friendly materials that can safely go in the compost bin, Eichner said.

The cafe, which is also serves as a training kitchen for commercial food preparation, uses locally sourced products when possible. Food waste is composted, Eichner said.

Water- and energy-efficient appliances cook food and wash dishes.

At Kindred Kitchen, on the ground floor of HopeWorks Station in Everett, Josue Malagon pours a drink into a compostable cup. The kitchen uses compostable material for cups and takeout orders. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

At Kindred Kitchen, on the ground floor of HopeWorks Station in Everett, Josue Malagon pours a drink into a compostable cup. The kitchen uses compostable material for cups and takeout orders. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

In the lobby, which is closed for now due to the pandemic, a large touch-screen monitor displays in real time how much energy is being used and generated.

HopeWorks has 65 affordable studio, one- and two-bedroom apartments on the second, third and fourth floors.

Most are reserved for veterans, families in drug court and young people ages 16 to 24 who lack stable housing.

“What we have learned over the years is that many residents often lack a sense of community — they yearn to be seen, heard and valued.” CEO Safstrom said. “We are developing an empowerment model at Station Place around leadership and environmental sustainability that brings residents together alongside staff to create a safe, healthy, and welcoming environment for all.”

Each apartment has an energy gauge that tracks how much power is being used, and every floor has a recycling room. Residents receive a monthly report detailing their energy use.

Garbage, recycling and compost are separated by residents by using different buttons for the garbage chute on each level of HopeWorks Station in Everett. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Garbage, recycling and compost are separated by residents by using different buttons for the garbage chute on each level of HopeWorks Station in Everett. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

All the residences face a central outdoor courtyard planted with greenery and apple and pear trees.

The walkway’s concrete stones are loosely set to give a bit and create better drainage for runoff, Eichner said.

Hallways in the residence portion of the building are open, allowing fresh air to flow.

“This is a sunny, open building,” Eichner said.

Each floor has a recycling center and an energy-efficient laundry room.

On the building’s roof, more than 500 solar panels help power the building.

Bike racks line the walls of the parking garage at HopeWorks Station in Everett. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Bike racks line the walls of the parking garage at HopeWorks Station in Everett. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

“Our goal is to generate 5% more energy than we will actually use,” Eichner said.

A LEED plaque to commemorate the building’s platinum rating was installed on the front of the building on Friday.

HopeWorks Station plans a virtual ceremony to celebrate the achievement, Eichner said.

“This building is a combination of everything we believe in,” she said.

Janice Podsada; jpodsada@heraldnet.com; 425-339-3097; Twitter: JanicePods

Talk to us

More in Herald Business Journal

Double Barrel owner Lionel Madriz places a wine sale sign outside of his business on Friday, Nov. 19, 2021 in Snohomish, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Job-seekers today are choosy, forcing employers to adapt

If they even show up, prospective employees are calling the shots. First question: What’s the pay?

Local aero firms get $4.5 million from feds to protect jobs

Federal Aviation Manufacturing Jobs Protection Program grants were awarded to six Snohomish County employers.

FAA Administrator Steve Dickson speaks to lawmakers as Michael Stumo, holding a photo of his daughter Samya Rose Stumo, and his wife Nadia Milleron, sit behind him during a Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing on the implementation of aviation safety reform at the US Capitol in Washington on Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2021. Samya Stumo was among those killed in a Boeing 737 Max 8 crash in 2019. (AP Photo/Amanda Andrade-Rhoades)
Democrats push FAA for action against certain Boeing 737 Max employees

Rep. Rick Larsen co-signed the letter stating concerns over the “absence of rigorous accountability.”

FILE - In this June 12, 2017, file photo, a Boeing 787 airplane being built for Norwegian Air Shuttle is shown at Boeing Co.'s assembly facility, in Everett, Wash. Boeing is dealing with a new production problem involving its 787 jet, in which inspections have found flaws in the way that sections of the rear of the plane were joined together. Boeing said Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020, it's not an immediate safety risk but could cause the planes to age prematurely. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
FAA memo reveals more Boeing 787 manufacturing defects

The company said the problems do not present an immediate safety-of-flight issue.

Homes in The Point subdivision border the construction of the Go East Corp. landfill on Wednesday, Nov. 10, 2021 in Everett, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Mudslide briefly stalls housing project at former Everett landfill

The slide buried two excavators in September. Work has resumed to make room for nearly 100 new houses.

Ameé Quiriconi, Snohomish author, podcaster and entrepreneur.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Snohomish author’s handbook charts a course for female entrepreneurs

She’s invented sustainable concrete, run award-winning wedding venues and worked in business… Continue reading

A final environmental cleanup is set to begin next year at the ExxonMobil and ADC properties, neighboring the Port of Everett. Photo courtesy of the Washington State Department of Ecology.
Port of Everett to get $350K for its costs in soil clean-up

The end is finally in sight for a project to scrub petroleum from two waterfront parcels, owned by ExxonMobil and ADC.

Shawn Loring, owner of Lazy Boy Brewing, received $10,000 through Everett's federal CARES Act funding.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Everett, Snohomish breweries to open on Everett waterfront

Lazy Boy Brewing and Sound to Summit see a bright future at the port’s Waterfront Place.

A woman walks by models of Boeing Co. aircraft, including the manufacturer's new Boeing 777X, at the Dubai Air Show in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Wednesday, Nov. 17, 2021. (AP Photo/Jon Gambrell)
India’s Akasa Air buys engines worth $4.5 billion for new 737 Maxs

Boeing clinched a deal at the Dubai Air Show to sell 72 of the jets for some $9 billion.

FAA Administrator Steve Dickson speaks to lawmakers as Michael Stumo, holding a photo of his daughter Samya Rose Stumo, and his wife Nadia Milleron, sit behind him during a Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing on the implementation of aviation safety reform at the US Capitol in Washington on Wednesday, Nov. 3, 2021. Samya Stumo was among those killed in a Boeing 737 Max 8 crash in 2019. (AP Photo/Amanda Andrade-Rhoades)
FAA says Boeing is appointing people lacking expertise to oversee airplane certification

The company was replacing senior FAA-authorized engineers who took early retirement during the pandemic.

FILE - In this Wednesday, July 17, 2019, file photo, Rep. Angie Craig, D-Minn., center, talks with Paul Njoroge, right, who lost his wife and three young children, as Michael Stumo, left, who lost his daughter, looks on before the start of a House Transportation subcommittee hearing on aviation safety, on Capitol Hill in Washington. The year since the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max has been a journey through grief, anger and determination for the families of those who died, as well as having far-reaching consequences for the aeronautics industry as it brought about the grounding of all Boeing 737 Max 8 and 9 jets, which remain out of service. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
Boeing settles with Ethiopia 737 Max crash victims

The agreement allows victims’ families to pursue claims in U.S. courts instead of their home country.

Dennie Willard, a Navy veteran, became homeless in 2014 and began job training through HopeWorks at Renew Home and Decor. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Looking for his ‘last job,’ veteran found new work, new life

U.S. Navy veteran Dennis Willard, once homeless, now works for the nonprofit that helped him.