A man walks past the carport roof, which is covered with solar panels, at HopeWorks Station in Everett. The project has been awarded a Platinum LEED certificate for environmentally friendly design and features. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

A man walks past the carport roof, which is covered with solar panels, at HopeWorks Station in Everett. The project has been awarded a Platinum LEED certificate for environmentally friendly design and features. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Affordable housing project takes top honors for green design

HopeWorks Station in Everett earned the highest LEED rating for energy-saving and eco-friendly features.

EVERETT — HopeWorks Station gave 102 people a home when it opened in October. The center at 3315 Broadway Ave. provides housing, job training and social services for people who are homeless or live in poverty.

Now there’s another reason to celebrate.

HopeWorks recently learned that its new building took top honors for green design and energy efficiency.

The development received a Platinum Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certificate from the U.S. Green Building Council, a non-profit group.

Only 10% of buildings that apply for certification receive a LEED platinum rating, according to the council.

The group’s ranking system consists of four levels — certified, silver, gold and platinum.

“We think this is may be the first building in Everett to be awarded a platinum level certificate,” said Cynthia Eichner, director of community engagement at HopeWorks, a Housing Hope affiliate.

Housing Hope and HopeWorks Social Enterprises developed the $30 million project, which was funded by 13 sources, including grants from the city of Everett, Snohomish County, the state of Washington, tax credits and loans from social investors.

Dykeman Architects, an Everett firm, designed the building.

HopeWorks Station on Broadway in Everett. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

HopeWorks Station on Broadway in Everett. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

What’s so green about HopeWorks Station?

It’s a long list that includes solar panels, electric-vehicle charging stations, triple-pane energy-efficient windows, a bike repair station, multiple bike racks and apple trees.

Start with the carport between the new HopeWorks Station and the center’s Renew Home & Decor consignment store. Solar panels are installed on top of the carport’s roof. Not only does it keep the rain off the parking lot, it generates power.

Fred Safstrom, CEO of Housing Hope and HopeWorks, said the two groups have been incorporating sustainability throughout their projects over the years, in addition to developing affordable housing and workforce development programs in Snohomish County.

“This project is not the first, nor the last, and is a huge and impactful step in the right direction,” Safstrom said in an email.

A monitor in the lobby at HopeWorks Station in Everett shows daily energy usage, cost and savings. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

A monitor in the lobby at HopeWorks Station in Everett shows daily energy usage, cost and savings. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

“We are so excited to be the first to receive this award in the city of Everett and so grateful to all of our partners involved in achieving this LEED Platinum Certification,” Safstrom said. “We are proud to set good example of maintaining a balance between economic growth, social equity, and environment quality what some define as sustainability. From our perspective, the achievement of this award supports our mission, workforce development programs and environmental sustainability.”

At Kindred Kitchen, the building’s first-floor restaurant, bowls, plates and to-go bags are made of eco-friendly materials that can safely go in the compost bin, Eichner said.

The cafe, which is also serves as a training kitchen for commercial food preparation, uses locally sourced products when possible. Food waste is composted, Eichner said.

Water- and energy-efficient appliances cook food and wash dishes.

At Kindred Kitchen, on the ground floor of HopeWorks Station in Everett, Josue Malagon pours a drink into a compostable cup. The kitchen uses compostable material for cups and takeout orders. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

At Kindred Kitchen, on the ground floor of HopeWorks Station in Everett, Josue Malagon pours a drink into a compostable cup. The kitchen uses compostable material for cups and takeout orders. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

In the lobby, which is closed for now due to the pandemic, a large touch-screen monitor displays in real time how much energy is being used and generated.

HopeWorks has 65 affordable studio, one- and two-bedroom apartments on the second, third and fourth floors.

Most are reserved for veterans, families in drug court and young people ages 16 to 24 who lack stable housing.

“What we have learned over the years is that many residents often lack a sense of community — they yearn to be seen, heard and valued.” CEO Safstrom said. “We are developing an empowerment model at Station Place around leadership and environmental sustainability that brings residents together alongside staff to create a safe, healthy, and welcoming environment for all.”

Each apartment has an energy gauge that tracks how much power is being used, and every floor has a recycling room. Residents receive a monthly report detailing their energy use.

Garbage, recycling and compost are separated by residents by using different buttons for the garbage chute on each level of HopeWorks Station in Everett. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Garbage, recycling and compost are separated by residents by using different buttons for the garbage chute on each level of HopeWorks Station in Everett. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

All the residences face a central outdoor courtyard planted with greenery and apple and pear trees.

The walkway’s concrete stones are loosely set to give a bit and create better drainage for runoff, Eichner said.

Hallways in the residence portion of the building are open, allowing fresh air to flow.

“This is a sunny, open building,” Eichner said.

Each floor has a recycling center and an energy-efficient laundry room.

On the building’s roof, more than 500 solar panels help power the building.

Bike racks line the walls of the parking garage at HopeWorks Station in Everett. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Bike racks line the walls of the parking garage at HopeWorks Station in Everett. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

“Our goal is to generate 5% more energy than we will actually use,” Eichner said.

A LEED plaque to commemorate the building’s platinum rating was installed on the front of the building on Friday.

HopeWorks Station plans a virtual ceremony to celebrate the achievement, Eichner said.

“This building is a combination of everything we believe in,” she said.

Janice Podsada; jpodsada@heraldnet.com; 425-339-3097; Twitter: JanicePods

Talk to us

More in Herald Business Journal

Dan Bates / The Herald
When Seattle Genetics founder, Clay Siegall lost his father while in college, he switched from studying for an MD to studying for a PhD., and a goal to treat cancer patients.  His efforts are paying off in lives.
Bothell biotech CEO resigns after domestic-violence allegation

Clay Siegall co-founded Seagen, which develops therapies for cancer patients. He’s accused of attacking his wife.

FILE - A sign at a Starbucks location in Havertown, Pa., is seen April 26, 2022. Starbucks says it will pay travel expenses for U.S. employees to access abortion or gender-confirmation procedures if those services aren't available within 100 miles of a worker’s home. The Seattle coffee chain says, Monday, May 16, 2022, the benefit will also be available to dependents of employees enrolled in its health care coverage. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, file)
Starbucks will cover travel for workers seeking abortions

Amazon and Tesla also will provide the benefit. Walmart and Facebook have stayed silent.

A barista pours steamed milk into a red paper cup while making an espresso drink at a Starbucks coffee shop in the Pike Place Market, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2015, in Seattle. It's as red as Santa's suit, a poinsettia blossom or a loud Christmas sweater. Yet Starbucks' minimalist new holiday coffee cup has set off complaints that the chain is making war on Christmas. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
Interfaith group asks Starbucks to drop vegan milk surcharge

They say the practice amounts to a tax on people who have embraced plant-based lifestyles.

FILE - In this Monday, March 1, 2021 file photo, The first Alaska Airlines passenger flight on a Boeing 737-9 Max airplane takes off on a flight to San Diego from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in Seattle. A Boeing pilot involved in testing the 737 Max jetliner was indicted Thursday, Oct. 14,2021 by a federal grand jury on charges of deceiving safety regulators who were evaluating the plane, which was later involved in two deadly crashes. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
Alaska Airlines to keep canceling flights at high level for weeks

Flight cancellations since April will continue. The chaos has been damaging for Seattle’s hometown airline.

FILE - An airplane flies past the Boeing logo on the company's headquarters in Chicago, on Thursday, Dec. 20, 2001. Boeing Co., a leading defense contractor and one of the world's two dominant manufacturers of airline planes, is expected to move its headquarters from Chicago to the Washington, D.C., area, according to two people familiar with the matter. The decision could be announced as soon as later Thursday, May 5, 2022, according to one of the people. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
Boeing expected to move headquarters from Chicago to DC area

The move would put Boeing executives close to their key customer, the Pentagon, and the FAA.

This 3D rendering shows Sila's 6000-foot facility in Moses Lake, to be used to manufacture lithium-ion anode battery materials. (Business Wire)
New factory in Moses Lake will bring hundreds of new jobs

The plant will manufacture lithium-ion anode battery materials for cars and cellphones.

Dr. David Kirtley at the new Helion headquarters, Antares, in Everett, Washington on Wednesday, Jan. 19, 2022  (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Helion Energy: New Everett company has the sun in its eyes

The firm is the winner of a new award by Economic Alliance Snohomish County, called Opportunity Lives Here.

Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring is this year's winner of the Henry M. Jackson Award given by Economic Alliance Snohomish County. Photographed in Marysville, Washington on April 25, 2022. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Jon Nehring: Longtime Marysville mayor who’s nurtured growth

He’s helped steer the city’s transformation and is winner of the Jackson Award by Economic Alliance Snohomish County.

Monti Ackerman, recipient of the John Fluke Award, is pictured Thursday, April 28, 2022, outside his office in Everett, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Monti Ackerman: A passionate volunteer and calculator whiz

The Fortive executive is the winner of this year’s Fluke Award by Economic Alliance Snohomish County.

Rep. Mike Sells, D-38, is the recipient of this year's Henry M. Jackson award. The award recognizes a visionary leader who through partnership, tenacity and a strong commitment to community has created lasting opportunities to improve quality of life and positively impact the regional economy. Photographed in Everett, Washington on April 29, 2022.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Rep. Mike Sells: He fought for WSU Everett and worker rights

The retiring legislator is the recipient of the Floyd Award from Economic Alliance Snohomish County.

People sit outside the recently opened Amazon Go facility Wednesday, April 27, 2022, in Mill Creek, Washington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)
Cashier-less Amazon Go buzzing in Mill Creek grand opening

Locals came to check out the high-tech store, with $3 avocado toast and cameras watching customers’ every move.

Joel Bervell (Courtesy photo)
TikTok med student @joelbervell named top Emerging Leader

Joel Bervell, who highlights disparities in medicine, took top honors at an event for 12 rising stars in Snohomish County.