A Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max airplane parked last month at Renton Municipal Airport in Renton. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

A Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max airplane parked last month at Renton Municipal Airport in Renton. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Boeing doesn’t expect Max to be cleared to fly until summer

That timetable would be five or six months longer than Boeing predicted for the grounded 737 late last year.

Associated Press and Herald staff

The Boeing Co. doesn’t expect federal regulators to approve changes to the grounded 737 Max until this summer, Boeing said Tuesday.

That timetable would be five or six months longer than Boeing predicted late last year, and it’s the latest of several delays in the plane’s re-approval process.

The three U.S. airlines that own Maxes — Southwest, American and United — have scrubbed the plane from their schedules until early June. It is possible, however, that they won’t use the planes until much later, possibly after the busy summer travel season is over.

If the Max returns to flight as now planned, airlines will need additional time to train pilots on changes that Boeing is making after two crashes killed 346 people. That means the Max’s return to service could be pushed past the peak summer travel season.

The latest timetable is based on work remaining to be done before the Federal Aviation Administration will allow the Max back in the sky, according to the two people familiar with the matter, who spoke Tuesday on condition of anonymity to discuss timing that Boeing has not publicly announced.

“We are informing our customers and suppliers that we are currently estimating that the ungrounding of the 737 MAX will begin during mid-2020,” the company said in a news release. “This updated estimate is informed by our experience to date with the certification process. It is subject to our ongoing attempts to address known schedule risks and further developments that may arise in connection with the certification process. It also accounts for the rigorous scrutiny that regulatory authorities are rightly applying at every step of their review of the 737 MAX’s flight control system and the Joint Operations Evaluation Board process which determines pilot training requirements.”

Talk to us

More in Herald Business Journal

County staff urges ‘no’ on Point Wells development proposal

County Hearing Examiner Peter Camp could decide the fate of the high-rise project this summer.

Alderwood mall is ready for the governor’s green light

The Lynnwood shopping center, closed since March 24, could reopen in June. But expect changes.

Snohomish County seeks to enter second phase of reopening

The variance request will go to the state if approved by the Board of Health and the County Council.

Firm accused of violating eviction ban agrees to restitution

About 1,450 tenants, including some in Marysville, will receive rent refunds or direct payments.

Texan comes to defend Snohomish outlaw barber cutting hair

Bob Martin is defying orders to close. The man he calls his attorney didn’t go to law school.

Hundreds of masked guests line up as Tulalip casinos reopen

Tulalip Resort Casino and Quil Ceda Creek opened the doors on Tuesday after a two-month closure.

Boeing workers cope with the virus threat as layoffs loom

Five weeks after they returned to work, Boeing workers say measures inside the plants are mostly working.

Boeing cutting more than 12,000 jobs with layoffs, buyouts

The company said it will lay off 6,770 workers this week, and another 5,520 are taking buyouts.

Worst jobless rate in the state: Snohomish County at 20.2%

In April, 91,383 were unemployed in the county. The aerospace sector was hit especially hard.

Small business relief effort inundated with 850 applications

The economy in and around Everett has struggled amid fallen revenues and uncertainty about the future.

‘Hundreds of millions’ in bogus jobless benefits paid out

Washington state has been reported as the top target of a Nigerian fraud ring.

Marysville drivers wait overnight for Chick-fil-A opening

The popular chicken restaurant began serving at 6:30 a.m. Thursday. Police plan to guide traffic for days.