Top (L-R): Jay Inslee, Rick Larsen. Bottom (L-R): Dave Somers, Dan Eernissee.

Top (L-R): Jay Inslee, Rick Larsen. Bottom (L-R): Dave Somers, Dan Eernissee.

Local leaders react to Boeing’s grim news about cuts, delays

“Yet another devastating blow,” said U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen, D-Everett.

EVERETT — Area political leaders looked Wednesday for a silver lining in the dour news of Boeing’s plan to scale back operations in Everett.

U.S. Rep. Rick Larsen, chair of the House Aviation Subcommittee, called Boeing’s planned production cuts and delays to the 747, 777 and 787 models a disappointment

— “yet another devastating blow to the workers and local communities I represent who are absorbing the COVID-19 pandemic, a historic drop in air travel and the uncertainty of 787 production in Northwest Washington,” Larsen, an Everett Democrat, said in a written statement.

“Still, Northwest Washington’s aviation and aerospace workforce is the best in the world. The region’s strong education system, robust supply chains and extensive experience building aircraft make the Northwest resilient to even a historic disruption like this,” Larsen wrote.

Other reaction:

Gov. Jay Inslee: “We stand ready to support workers impacted by the production changes and possible layoffs announced by Boeing on its quarterly earnings call today. … We’ve got the most talented workforce in the world, unparalleled infrastructure and, according to a 2019 TEAL Group study, we’re ‘the top ranked state and the most competitive business environment for major aerospace manufacturing.’ That same study ranked South Carolina in 27th place.”

Snohomish County Executive Dave Somers: “We stand ready to do all we can to support Boeing and its workforce during these challenging times. We are a resilient and innovative community and will pull together as we always do. We know Everett is the best place for 787 and wide-body plane production.”

Everett Economic Development Director Dan Eernissee: “Boeing is a pillar of our community along with over 50 aerospace companies that call Everett home. When this industry suffers, it affects us all. The City of Everett is weathering this storm as a partner side-by-side with affected companies and workers, and we are confident that together we will rise above the hardships caused by the pandemic.”

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