Maltby warehouse envisioned as a soil-less marijuana grow op

The operation would be one of the largest indoor cannabis farms in Snohomish County.

MALTBY — A proposal for a Maltby warehouse would replace truck manufacturing with dirt-free marijuana growing.

An application has been filed with the county to convert the former OSW Equipment & Repair building near Maltby Road and Highway 522. The remodel would bring the footprint to 100,000 square feet.

The operation would be one of the largest indoor marijuana growing enterprises in Snohomish County. The company expects to employ up to 60 people per shift, according to public records.

The grower plans to use aeroponic technology — a soil-less growing system.

Seattle-based Premier NW Holdings Inc purchased the 2.6-acre site in July 2017, according to property records. The sale price was nearly $4 million.

The proposal more than triples the size of the existing steel and concrete warehouse and adds two upper floors.

The plan includes installing new plumbing and electrical wiring along with updating the fire sprinkler and alarm system.

The company is expected to obtain two licenses from the state’s Liquor and Cannabis Board. Licenses are separated into three categories based on the number of plants. The ones sought in Maltby are tier three, which allows for the greatest quantity of dedicated plant canopy, up to 30,000 square feet.

The county received the application for permits in January and is still reviewing the documents.

Lizz Giordano: 425-374-4165; egiordano@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @lizzgior.

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