People attending a Seattle City Council meeting on Tuesday hold signs as the listen to public comment before the council voted to repeal of a tax on large companies intended to combat a growing homelessness crisis. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

People attending a Seattle City Council meeting on Tuesday hold signs as the listen to public comment before the council voted to repeal of a tax on large companies intended to combat a growing homelessness crisis. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

Will Amazon’s work to kill Seattle tax spook other cities?

The City Council rescinded a tax on large companies that was intended to address homelessness.

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