A man carries items in a plastic bag as he walks down Evergreen Way. On Wednesday, the city of Everett passed a ban on the bags. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

A man carries items in a plastic bag as he walks down Evergreen Way. On Wednesday, the city of Everett passed a ban on the bags. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Everett City Council approves ban on single-use plastic bags

It will go into effect in September. Shoppers will be able to purchase a thicker plastic or paper bag for $0.05.

EVERETT — Starting in September, retailers in Everett will be barred from using single-use plastic bags at checkout.

Councilmembers unanimously approved the ban Wednesday night. Shoppers will have the option of purchasing a thicker plastic or paper bag for $0.05. They also can bring their own.

The local organization 350 Everett proposed the reusable bag ordinance earlier this year, working with the advocacy group Zero Waste Washington.

The change is going to improve the cleanliness and look of neighborhoods, said Pam Kepford, who led the push for 350 Everett.

“This is one place individual people can make a difference,” she said.

Presenting the proposal to neighborhood groups and councilmembers, she earned her nickname “Bag Lady.”

More than 20 jurisdictions in Washington already prohibit the single-use plastic bags, including Edmonds, Mukilteo, Shoreline and Quil Ceda Village.

In early December, a statewide ban was proposed that would preempt local ordinances.

Despite that statewide effort, the action taken in Everett is still valuable, said Heather Trim, executive director of Zero Waste Washington.

“It’s going to take a while for a statewide bill to pass and go into effect,” she said Thursday.

Madison Miller, a spokeswoman for the Downtown Everett Association, said she hasn’t heard any complaints from businesses about the new restrictions.

She believes they aren’t impacted as much because many have already moved away from plastic bags to paper.

The ban will also apply to restaurants and carry-out orders, except for bags used to prevent spillage.

Dry cleaning and newspaper sacks will be permitted.

Households that qualify for food assistance will be exempted from the $0.05 fee.

The city plans on using the nine-month rollout period for outreach to residents and businesses. The ban will go into effect Sept. 30, 2019.

Lizz Giordano: 425-374-4165; egiordano@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @lizzgior.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Snohomish County Sheriff Adam Fortney during an interview at the sheriff’s department June 17, 2020. (Sue Misao / The Herald)
Auditor denies Fortney recall group the extra time it seeks

He said he could extend the deadline for signature gathering if ordered by a court or the Governor.

NO CAPTION NECESSARY: Logo for the Cornfield Report by Jerry Cornfield. 20200112
Private prisons, police reform and a Black pioneer’s plaque

Here’s what’s happening on Day 45 of the 2021 session of the Washington Legislature.

Everett man identified after being found dead in creek

The cause of death for Renee Baltazar Romero remained under investigation Thursday.

Joe Hempel swims off of the shore of Seawall Park on Friday, Jan. 29, 2021 in Langley, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Scantily clad is the dress code for these cold rush swimmers

Immersed for 30 minutes in frigid water would kill most of us. It energizes these swimmers.

Everett man found dead in creek near Lake Stevens

The man, 28, was reported missing Thursday. A neighbor found his body in Little Pilchuck Creek.

When not at home, Brett Bass keeps his rifle locked in a 600-lb. safe at his home on Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018 in Edmonds, Wa. Bass, an NRA certified firearms instructor and safety officer, is one of three Edmonds residents who sued to block the city's safe storage gun law from being enforced. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)
Appeals court says Edmonds can’t enforce safe storage gun law

State law “unambiguously” pre-empts the city from enacting its own firearm rules, the panel concludes.

A Washington State Patrol detective photographs the vehicle involved in hit and run double fatality in Bothell Friday on February 19, 2021.  (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
Fatal hit-and-run victims identified after Friday crash

They were Carson M. Cox, 32, and Sarah L. Foxheath, 39, according to the state patrol.

Autopsy shows Lake Stevens woman, 20, drowned Saturday

Anna M. Lopez was swimming when witnesses noticed she was not responsive, according to officials.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee speaks at a news conference, Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2021, at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash. Inslee said some COVID-19 restrictions in Washington will be eased beginning next week and the state will change its reopening plan to move from a county-based oversight system to one focused on regions. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
Inslee: All of Washington to stay in Phase 2 for a few weeks

The governor issued a weekslong pause on regions moving backward, but has yet to outline a Phase 3.

Most Read