(L-R): Todd Welch, Carolyn Bennett and Mary Dickinson.

(L-R): Todd Welch, Carolyn Bennett and Mary Dickinson.

Lake Stevens candidates talk jobs, safety, traffic, Costco

Incumbent Todd Welch is up against Mary Dickinson and Carolyn Bennett for a seat on the city council.

LAKE STEVENS — Those running for city council in the growing lakeside town are focused on public safety, reducing traffic, and increasing the number of jobs.

Three people are vying for one four-year position on the Lake Stevens City Council. Incumbent Todd Welch is seeking a third term.

He’s up against Carolyn Bennett and Mary Dickinson. Neither have held public office before.

The Aug. 6 primary election comes as the city is working with Costco Wholesale to potentially build a store along Highway 9. Other big projects are coming to that road, including work on an intersection near Frontier Village.

Todd Welch

Todd Welch

Todd Welch

Welch, 49, has been on the city council for eight years and has lived in Lake Stevens for about 15.

He moved to the area with the Navy in 1995, when he was assigned to Naval Station Everett aboard the USS Ingraham.

Welch hopes to stay on the City Council to see planned projects through to completion, such as the roadwork on Highway 9.

Another of his priorities is public safety. He’d like to retain the number of officers in the Lake Stevens Police Department and keep their training up-to-date.

He hopes to work on bringing more parks to the city and to create more jobs. That’s one of the reasons he’d like to see Issaquah-based Costco move in.

“I think they are exactly the kind of commercial partner the city wants to have,” he said. “It’s a good local company, they provide good wages to their employees, they are environmentally conscious.”

Welch believes he’s the best choice because of his experience, and the relationships he’s built with other city and county councilmembers, and state lawmakers.

“They know I’m somebody they can trust,” he said. “When I say something my integrity is there and I follow up.”

Carolyn Bennett

Carolyn Bennett

Carolyn Bennett

Bennett, 48, has spent most of her life in Lake Stevens. Her first job was at a drug store called Mitchell’s Pharmacy that used to be in Frontier Village.

“I’ve seen the ups and downs of the population boom, and all the challenges we’re experiencing, the growing pains,” she said. “So I certainly understand them from the inside out.”

Bennett became a reservist in the Marine Corps after high school, and attended Edmonds Community College and the University of Washington.

Heavy traffic is one of her biggest issues. She also has noticed more people who are homeless in Lake Stevens.

“I’ve experienced encampments in the property bordering my property, so I’ve dealt with the situation kind of directly and feel that is something we need to get ahead of and be proactive,” she said.

Lastly, she wants to bring more small businesses to Lake Stevens. She also is looking forward to a possible Costco, for sales tax revenue that could benefit those who live in the city.

Mary Dickinson

Mary Dickinson

Mary Dickinson

Dickinson, 74, moved to Lake Stevens about three years ago to be closer to her children. She believes that’s one reason she’d be the best choice.

“Because I’m newer here, my eyes are fresher,” she said.

Dickinson first walked door-to-door when campaigning to bring a new library to the city.

“I met so many people and learned so much about this community that I decided I would like to serve this town,” she said.

She’s had the same neighborhood-surveying approach in her own campaign.

People told her they’d like to see safer walkways, affordable housing and a bigger library or community center with more resources. Those are some of the main issues she’d address on the City Council.

When it comes to Costco, Dickinson is worried about the impact on wetlands and the traffic and noise the big store could create. On the other hand, she’d like to see the tax dollars used on infrastructure in the city, such as sidewalks.

“I can’t say, ‘Ya-hoo, I’m so glad Costco is coming.’ I wish I could,” she said. “I do know we need something like that. We need that revenue.”

Ballots must be returned by 8 p.m. Aug. 6. The drop box in Lake Stevens is located at 1800 Main St., near the boat launch.

The top two candidates will advance to the Nov. 5 general election.

Stephanie Davey: 425-339-3192; sdavey@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @stephrdavey.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Everett
Man shot at Everett apartment

The man in his 30s was shot Sunday night. No arrests had been made.

Logo for news use featuring the municipality of Lake Stevens in Snohomish County, Washington. 220118
Motorcyclist identified in fatal crash near Lake Stevens

Anthony Palko, 33, died Monday night after colliding with a passenger car. The juveniles in the car were taken to the hospital.

Marysville
Police: Marysville man shot sword-wielding roommate in self-defense

The roommates were arguing over eBay sales, according to police. Then one of them allegedly brandished a two-foot sword.

Logo for news use featuring the municipality of Lake Stevens in Snohomish County, Washington. 220118
Everett boy, 12, identified as Davies Beach drowning victim

Malachi Bell was one of three swimmers in distress Sunday in Lake Stevens. He did not survive.

Everett
Port of Everett hosting annual open house after pandemic hiatus

Also, Rustic Cork Wine Bar plans to open a second shop at Fisherman’s Harbor — the latest addition to the port’s “wine walk.”

The “Village of Hope,” a tiny home community including 17 shelters, is set to open on Mission Hill Road in Tulalip in September. (Tulalip Tribes)
Tulalip Tribes to open tiny home village with 17 shelters

It’s called the Village of Hope. Monthly culture nights will feature classes in Lushootseed and “Tulalip cooking.”

Everett Code Enforcement issued a violation citation to the owner of the Grand Apartments building at 2331 Rockefeller Ave., after allegedly finding exposed electrical wiring and evidence of unpermitted electrical and plumbing work. (City of Everett)
Grand Apartments, which saw outcry from tenants, faces code violations

The Everett complex has had its share of issues. Now the city is threatening fines if something isn’t done.

"Shoes are like jeans," says Dominic Ahn, 53, who took over ownership from his parents, who started the store 40 years ago. Photographed in Edmonds, Washington on June 30, 2022. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
EEEEEE! Edmonds shoe shop sells wide shoes only

The store has over 600 styles of work and play shoes for men and women with feet from D to 8E widths.

Tomato is charred by Joel Childs Thursday afternoon at The Chef Behind The Curtain in Snohomish, Washington on June 30, 2022. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
This tiny Snohomish restaurant is a best-kept secret among locals

You don’t have to travel to Seattle — or drain your savings — for a fine dining experience.

Most Read