Marysville offers $200,000 in federal grants to nonprofits

The City Council set aside the funds from the American Rescue Plan Act. Applications are due by April 1.

Marysville

MARYSVILLE — Grants are available for Marysville nonprofits providing human services like assistance for food, utilities or shelter.

The Marysville City Council designated $200,000 from the federal American Rescue Plan Act for projects serving low- and moderate-income Marysville residents earlier this year.

There’s no cap on award amounts, and the city will allocate funds based on agencies’ demonstrated needs, said Connie Mennie, a spokesperson for the city.

All 501(c)(3) nonprofits are eligible that meet the minimum insurance requirements, comply with anti-discrimination laws and provide services in Marysville.

Applications should explain how grant funds will be used to address a “key need” for Marysville residents. They should also include the services provided, target population and a budget.

Nonprofits can apply online at marysvillewa.gov/1210/Human-Services-Grant-Program. Questions can be directed to program manager Dave Hall at dhall@marysvillewa.gov or 360-363-8403. Applications are due by 5 p.m. on April 1.

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