Memorial honors fallen Bothell police officer Jonathan Shoop

After a motorcade through the city, the rookie cop’s two brothers spoke at a service Tuesday in Bothell.

Bothell police officer Jonathan Shoop with his nephews after his police academy graduation earlier this year. (Family photo)

Bothell police officer Jonathan Shoop with his nephews after his police academy graduation earlier this year. (Family photo)

BOTHELL — A memorial for fallen Bothell officer Jonathan Shoop was marked by decorum and grief Tuesday.

Shoop, a U.S. Coast Guard sailor who responded to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, gave up a second career at Amazon to become a Bothell police officer in 2019. He was killed last month downtown in a brief shootout with a suspect. He was 32.

After a motorcade through the city Tuesday, his two brothers spoke beside portraits of Shoop and a casket draped with an American flag. At times fighting back their emotions, at times unable to resist some brotherly ribbing, they shared stories of what it was like to grow up with Jonny. Once he scored nine goals in a youth soccer game, a streak that ended when his coach benched him. He was the in-house computer expert in his family. He loved Christmas, singing carols and skipping around the house in a pair of maroon pants with penguins printed on them, a prized Christmas gift.

“Jonathan gave zero time to what others thought about him,” said his brother, Jared Shoop, a Duvall firefighter. “He was above the influence of others, and always authentic.”

He graduated from Ballard High School and the University of Washington. His 30s were supposed to be his time to buy a home, to embark on a new career and to “receive endless pressure from us brothers to have kids,” said his second-oldest sibling, Evan Shoop.

“I’ve never been more angry, it’s scary, and I’m sure some of you feel the same way,” his brother said. “But anger’s only going to get me so far. It’s not going to assist me to be the man that I need to be going forward, the man my brother would want me to be, for those that he left behind and loved.”

The memorial service for Bothell police officer Jonathan Shoop on Tuesday.

The memorial service for Bothell police officer Jonathan Shoop on Tuesday.

Coworkers at the police department and Amazon spoke of how Shoop felt a calling to become a police officer.

The Texas man accused of opening fire on Shoop has been charged with aggravated murder in King County Superior Court.

Shoop is survived by his brothers, his mother and his girlfriend.

The memorial was invite-only due to COVID-19. Hundreds of people watched a live stream on Facebook.

You can view a replay here on the Bothell Police Department’s Facebook page. The actual service begins around the 19-minute mark.

Caleb Hutton: 425-339-3454; chutton@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @snocaleb.

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