Dakota Reed, 20, of Monroe, has been charged with two felony counts for threatening, anti-Semitic posts — like this one — made under seven fake names on Facebook. In the background is a flag showing a fascist symbol. (Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office)

Dakota Reed, 20, of Monroe, has been charged with two felony counts for threatening, anti-Semitic posts — like this one — made under seven fake names on Facebook. In the background is a flag showing a fascist symbol. (Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office)

Out on bail, Monroe man accused of new threats to kill Jews

A judge raised Dakota Reed’s bail to $500,000. The FBI found more anti-Semitic memes on Facebook.

MONROE — After being arrested and accused of threatening a mass shooting at a synagogue, a Monroe man continued to spew violent messages on Facebook, according to new court records.

“Y’all mind if I go in to a random courthouse in the movie Narnia and take my M32 grenade launcher?” read one post on Dakota Reed’s page.

Weeks earlier, Reed had posted $50,000 bond in a case where he’s now charged with two counts of threats to bomb or injure property. In light of the new posts, a Snohomish County Superior Court judge raised his bail tenfold to $500,000.

Reed, 20, has been in jail since April 8.

Charging papers recount many alarming anti-Semitic posts that Reed shared on Facebook, using aliases Tom Shill and William King.

“I’m shooting for 30 Jews,” he wrote in late 2018, according to court papers. “No pun needed. Long ways away anyways. See you Goys.”

The posts were made over the course of months.

Some referenced a vague plot to shoot up a synagogue in 2025, or else to target a school. He wrote about “pulling a Dylann Roof,” in reference to the white supremacist who gunned down nine African Americans when they shut their eyes to pray at a church in Charleston, South Carolina.

Reed shared pictures of himself with rifles in a bedroom where a fascist flag had been tacked up on his wall. A dozen guns were later seized from his family home on High Bridge Road, when the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office was granted an extreme risk protection order in December.

Reed spent one weekend in the Snohomish County Jail before posting bond.

Within weeks, he was allegedly posting again on Facebook under his real name, the court records show.

“Coming for my guns, the police is,” he posted, with an image of the “Star Wars” character Yoda. “Booby trapped with explosives, my front door has been.”

Another new post showed a semiautomatic rifle covered in hateful slogans and sick jokes about Muslim refugees. The gun had been used in the massacre of 50 people at New Zealand mosques.

The bloodshed was streamed live on the web.

“You can’t do your job correctly, so you blame me?” Reed wrote for a caption. “Good luck getting better at your job. If you only know how much worse things were going to get for you, (anti-Semitic slur), (racial slur), Feds.”

Earlier, he’d reportedly claimed in an interview with detectives that a Jewish person had once gotten him fired. Other than that, he struggled to think of a reason why he felt anger toward Jews, according to charging papers. In the interview, he told authorities he wasn’t concerned about how people would react to his posts, because he thought of them as fictional.

“It’s always a challenge interpreting intent through the ‘everything-is-a-meme’ nature of his posts,” wrote an FBI agent, in an email alerting prosecutors to the new posts. “But hearing the New Zealand shooter say ‘subscribe to pewdiepie’ in his video and write ‘remove kebab’ on his rifle have only reinforced how these internet subcultures and vernacular can carry all the way into real life actions.”

Much like the New Zealand suspect, Reed was fluent in racist memes that fester in dark, far-right corners of the internet.

The threat to bring a grenade launcher to court was accompanied by a meme made popular by 4Chan, a website where supposedly edgy jokes take on their own language.

“Must take break from fashy metalcore,” he wrote. “Happy drunk time. Blease help us kill ZOG, Slavs.”

“Fashy” means fascist, in alt-right slang.

Metalcore” is a blend of metal and punk music.

“ZOG” means Zionist Occupied Government, reflecting a far-right conspiracy theory that Jews control the U.S. government, according to the Anti-Defamation League.

That post was made the day before prosecutors filed charges in Superior Court.

Reed was not charged with a hate crime. The Snohomish County Prosecutor’s Office declined to comment on the pending case Friday.

A tentative trial date has been set for late May, for the two felony counts.

Caleb Hutton: 425-339-3454; chutton@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @snocaleb.

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