Two budtenders stay busy while helping serve a steady stream of customers during 210 Cannabis Co’s grand opening Dec. 10, in Arlington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Two budtenders stay busy while helping serve a steady stream of customers during 210 Cannabis Co’s grand opening Dec. 10, in Arlington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Stillaguamish Tribe opens retail cannabis shop

More than 1,500 attended a grand opening on Dec. 10. The venture comes amid a boom in tribal cannabis stores.

ARLINGTON — New players are getting into the recreational cannabis business eight years after legal sales started in Washington state.

The latest is the Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians, who opened a retail cannabis shop in September.

The store, 210 Cannabis, is part of a recent boom in tribal pot shops, which bring in revenue for tribes like the Stillaguamish.

A line wrapped around the building last weekend for the grand opening of the store, just off I-5 exit 210 near Arlington. Patrons posed for pictures with actor and cannabis advocate Tommy Chong, 84, of the comedy duo Cheech & Chong.

A line already wrapped around the building continues to grow as people arrive during 210 Cannabis Co’s grand opening Dec. 10, in Arlington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

A line already wrapped around the building continues to grow as people arrive during 210 Cannabis Co’s grand opening Dec. 10, in Arlington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

The weed shop is just a few minutes’ drive from the tribe’s Angel of the Winds Casino Resort. The store is in a brand-new building with floor-to-ceiling windows and smooth wood counters.

“Sales have been going great,” said Sean Corboy, 210 Cannabis purchasing manager. “Seems like we are gaining traction with the locals.”

More than 1,500 customers attended the grand opening on Dec. 10 and the store reported 550 sales.

On Monday, Corboy pointed out the store’s bestseller and signature product: $2.10 marijuana joints. The discounted joints have the quality of $8 to $10 joints, he said.

“We are trying to shoot for the best quality at any price range,” he said.

He added the store offers many wellness products, such as topicals, CBD-based edibles and tinctures, with an emphasis on serving an older demographic.

Tommy Chong shakes hands with Selena Morales and Elijah Harrison, both of Arlington, after taking a photo with them and giving them a couple signatures during 210 Cannabis Co’s grand opening Dec. 10, in Arlington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Tommy Chong shakes hands with Selena Morales and Elijah Harrison, both of Arlington, after taking a photo with them and giving them a couple signatures during 210 Cannabis Co’s grand opening Dec. 10, in Arlington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

There’s lots of competition, with 60 cannabis retailers in Snohomish County. There’s also Remedy Tulalip, the pot store the Tulalip Tribe opened in 2018.

Damian Riley, marketing director for Angel of Winds Casino Resort, said the question for the tribe was “why not” open a retail cannabis store.

“It’s a great capitalistic venture and a competitive industry,” he said. “There was a local deficit in stores within this part of the region.”

Erica MacCurdy, left, looks over a couple items with the help of budtender Noni Johnson during 210 Cannabis Co’s grand opening Dec. 10, in Arlington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Erica MacCurdy, left, looks over a couple items with the help of budtender Noni Johnson during 210 Cannabis Co’s grand opening Dec. 10, in Arlington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Stillaguamish Tribe Chairman Eric White said the tribe had wanted to get into the retail cannabis business for years.

“It’s about increasing the tax base, that’s essentially it,” he said.

He said the tax revenue will go to support programs for the tribe’s 400 members.

The Stillaguamish Tribe, a sovereign nation, has a compact with the state in lieu of a license from the Liquor and Cannabis Board. The negotiated agreement outlines the guidelines for marijuana sales.

Marijuana products sit behind the counter during 210 Cannabis Co’s grand opening Dec. 10, in Arlington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Marijuana products sit behind the counter during 210 Cannabis Co’s grand opening Dec. 10, in Arlington. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

The state’s cannabis excise tax is 37%. Tribal stores must tax the same percentage, though tribes retain the revenue rather than sending it to the state.

In Washington, tribes with cannabis stores include the Swinomish Tribe, Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe, Suquamish Tribe, Puyallup Tribe and others, according to Leafly, a cannabis industry website.

Kia Patrick was excited to take part in the new venture at 210 Cannabis. She was hired as a customer experience supervisor out of more than 100 applicants for positions at the store. The store employs 18.

“This is untouched territory for me. It feels like a blessing,” said Patrick, who has worked in the cannabis industry for three years.

She said another bestseller is the roll-on topical Dragon Balm, a favorite of grandparents.

Carla Fisher and Lana Lasley take a photo together with Tommy Chong during 210 Cannabis Co’s grand opening Dec. 10, in Arlington. Fisher and Lasley waited in line solely to get a photo with Chong. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Carla Fisher and Lana Lasley take a photo together with Tommy Chong during 210 Cannabis Co’s grand opening Dec. 10, in Arlington. Fisher and Lasley waited in line solely to get a photo with Chong. (Ryan Berry / The Herald)

Visit 210 Cannabis

210 Cannabis is located at 1309 236th St. NE, Arlington. Cash and debit cards accepted. No credit cards.

Jacqueline Allison: 425-339-3434; jacqueline.allison@heraldnet.com; Twitter: @jacq_allison.

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