Family members Christi Aquilar high fives Tony Cea after bowling a strike at Glacier Lanes on Monday, Jan. 28, 2019 in Everett, Wa. Cea bowled a 300 recently, one of seven in his lifetime. Christie also has bowled a 300. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Family members Christi Aquilar high fives Tony Cea after bowling a strike at Glacier Lanes on Monday, Jan. 28, 2019 in Everett, Wa. Cea bowled a 300 recently, one of seven in his lifetime. Christie also has bowled a 300. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Strike after strike: A night to remember at Glacier Lanes

Yes, Tony Cea bowled a perfect game. But it’s not just about the score. It’s about family.

EVERETT — Glacier Lanes, usually a cacophony of rolling balls and clattering pins, came to a hush on a Monday evening in January.

Tony Cea, 47, was standing before a lane. Ahead of him, 10 pins stared at him defiantly. It was the last frame and they were the only things between him and a perfect game. He focused on breathing right and keeping his legs from shaking.

He took four steps and threw the ball. The throw was “kind of muddled,” he said. It came out lighter than he intended.

He stood and watched as the ball went down the lane. It curved to the right, hugging the gutter. Then, it curved back toward the center.

It smacked into the pins.

They all went down.

Strike.

He threw his arms up in the air. The whole room became a mess of yells and shouts and hollering and hooting.

Family members Tony Cea, left, Christi Aquilar, Nick Aquilar (in blue), high five as Vickie Pederson, right, records scores at Glacier Lanes on Jan. 28 in Everett. The family members compete as a team. Tony bowled a 300 recently, one of many in his lifetime. Christie also has bowled a 300. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Family members Tony Cea, left, Christi Aquilar, Nick Aquilar (in blue), high five as Vickie Pederson, right, records scores at Glacier Lanes on Jan. 28 in Everett. The family members compete as a team. Tony bowled a 300 recently, one of many in his lifetime. Christie also has bowled a 300. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

For Cea, this wasn’t just a perfect game, it was a perfect night with his family, who all participate in the Icebusters league every Monday. Cea, his mother Vickie Pederson, his sister Christi Aguilar and her son Nick Aguilar all scored over 200 points each, for a total of 1,002.

Three generations; 36 strikes in all.

Bowling is in this family’s blood. Pederson, 70, has been bowling for 52 years, and her late husband was a professional. He was the second person ever to score 300 at Glacier Lanes, which has been open since 1956.

Her kids grew up and worked in the alleys. “Ever since we could hold a ball,” Cea said — about 4 or 5 years old. Their father was patient, but told them how to throw one-handed from the beginning, because he wasn’t about to teach his own kids improper form. Christi Aguilar, 50, recalled tagging along and staying in hotels with her father when he went on tours.

Family members Christie Aquilar shows her ring for bowling a perfect game, a 300, at Glacier Lanes on Monday, Jan. 28, 2019 in Everett, Wa. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Family members Christie Aquilar shows her ring for bowling a perfect game, a 300, at Glacier Lanes on Monday, Jan. 28, 2019 in Everett, Wa. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

Nowadays, bowling is an excuse to get together once a week.

“It makes your family closer,” Pederson said.

Cea gave another reason why his family got into bowling. “It was something for my dad to impart his wisdom,” he said.

He said “there’s no rhyme or reason” to what will make a good game. He bowled lackluster games before and after his 300, not to mention that he was tired and had strongly considered going to bed instead.

Sometimes, he just finds a rhythm.

From a pouch, Tony Cea pulls out souvenirs from his highest games and series he has bowled over the years, at Glacier Lanes on Jan. 28 in Everett. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

From a pouch, Tony Cea pulls out souvenirs from his highest games and series he has bowled over the years, at Glacier Lanes on Jan. 28 in Everett. (Andy Bronson / The Herald)

“You just feel a groove,” he said.

Pederson said she’s witnessed changes in bowling over the years. She’s seen alleys switch ownership or close down entirely. She remembers when people, not computers, kept track of the score. (She believes that’s how her children learned how to count.) Even the balls have transformed, from rubber to plastic to urethane.

Though she sometimes grows nostalgic for the old days, nothing will deter her or her family from the sport.

“We will do it as long as we can, as our bodies will allow,” she said.

Zachariah Bryan: 425-339-3431; zbryan@heraldnet.com. Twitter: @zachariahtb.

Talk to us

More in Local News

Arif Ghouseat flips through his work binder in his office conference room Paine Field on Monday, Dec. 10, 2018 in Everett, Wa. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Paine Field Airport director departing for Sea-Tac job

Arif Ghouse, who oversaw the launch of commercial air travel at Paine Field, is leaving after eight years.

NO CAPTION. Logo to accompany news of education.
Public school enrollment still down, even as rural districts grow

Smaller districts in Snohomish County seem to be recovering more quickly — and gaining students — than their urban counterparts.

Angelica Montanari and daughter Makena, 1, outside of the Community Health Center of Snohomish County Everett-Central Clinic on Thursday, Feb. 2, 2023. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
Amid patient woes, CHC of Snohomish County staffers push for a union

Doctors and nurse practitioners are worried about providers being shut out from clinical decisions, which hurts patient care.

Students make their way after school at Edmonds-Woodway High School on March 12, 2020. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)
After Edmonds schools internet outage, staff ‘teaching like it’s the 1900s’

“Suspicious activities” on the district’s network delayed classes and caused schedule havoc. “Kids are using pencil and paper again.”

NO CAPTION NECESSARY: Logo for the Cornfield Report by Jerry Cornfield. 20200112
Retooling drug laws, protecting octopus and honoring a cactus

It’s already Day 26. Here’s what’s happening in the 2023 session of the Washington Legislature

April Berg, left, and John Lovick
Snohomish County legislators talk race, policy in Seattle

Rep. April Berg and Sen. John Lovick chatted about Tyre Nichols and education at an event kicking off Black History Month.

A suspect removes a rifle bag from a broken rear window of a Seattle police car on May 30 in downtown Seattle. An Everett man, Jacob D. Little, 24, has been charged with the theft of the high-powered rifle stolen from the car. This image is from the criminal complaint filed in U.S. District Court. 20200904
Everett man sentenced for stealing police gun in Seattle protest

Jacob Little, 26, now faces second-degree murder charges for allegedly killing a man in Renton in August 2020.

Switzerland delegate Markus Herrmann listens while 12th grade students speak with him during a special event set up for their AP Comparative Government class at Glacier Peak High School on Thursday, Feb. 2, 2023 in Snohomish, Washington. (Olivia Vanni / The Herald)
European delegates talk American culture with Glacier Peak students

Representatives from 18 different EU countries made a stop in Snohomish during their US tour.

Community Transit is leasing a 60-foot articulated BYD battery electric bus this year as an early step in the zero emission planning process. (Community Transit)
Community Transit testing 60-foot electric bus

The agency leased the BYD K11M for $132,000 this year as the first step in its zero-emission planning process.

Most Read