The Tulalip Tribes joined state and local leaders in calling on residents to stay home when not performing certain essential activities. Six tribal members have tested positive for COVID-19, including a tribal elder who died of the disease, according to the tribes. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

The Tulalip Tribes joined state and local leaders in calling on residents to stay home when not performing certain essential activities. Six tribal members have tested positive for COVID-19, including a tribal elder who died of the disease, according to the tribes. (Kevin Clark / The Herald)

Tulalip Tribes join the call for residents to stay home

Similar to other orders, the tribes say reservation residents should stay home except to do essential tasks.

TULALIP — The Tulalip Tribes have joined state and local leaders in calling on residents to stay home when not performing certain essential activities, starting Thursday.

The move is meant to help slow the spread of the new coronavirus.

The order applies to those who reside on the 22,000-acre Tulalip Indian Reservation and the people who visit it.

The order lists essential activities as:

■ Errands to maintain health and safety, such as medical appointments and trips to pick up medications.

■ Trips to get food and other necessary supplies.

■ Outdoor activity, provided a six-foot distance is maintained from other people.

■ Caring for an individual in another household

■ Treaty fishing, hunting or gathering.

Business and government services are allowed to continue operating. Those include:

■ Health care operations

■ Essential infrastructure and construction.

■ Grocery and convenience stories, including smoke shops.

■ Businesses that supply necessary goods and services.

■ Pharmacies, gas stations and banks.

■ Hardware stores.

About 2,700 people live on the reservation, according to the tribes’ website. As of Thursday, six Tulalip Tribes members had tested positive for COVID-19, including a tribal elder who died of the disease, according to the tribes.

Earlier this week, Tulalip shut down most tribal-owned businesses, including the Tulalip Resort Casino, Quil Ceda Casino and bingo. The Seattle Premium Outlets have been temporarily closed since March 18, according to their website, with some food delivery and takeout still available.

Julia-Grace Sanders: 425-339-3439; jgsanders@heraldnet.com.

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